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Aboriginal people at risk from over-the-counter painkillers

Greater education on the use of over-the-counter painkillers is needed for Aboriginal people to avoid potential health risks, according to new research.

The study found that few of the Aboriginal people interviewed were aware of the dangers of paracetamol overuse. Most were also unaware of the serious implications of taking painkillers with other medications, or using multiple painkillers at once.

The findings suggest that more culturally and linguistically appropriate information needs to be provided from doctors, pharmacists and Aboriginal health workers.

Read more at University of Adelaide

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26 Comments sorted by

  1. Grant Mahy

    Unemployed

    Yeah, one obvious thing missed is why do Aboriginal people take so many pain killers? Perhaps to kill pain.

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    1. Tom Hennessy

      Retired

      In reply to Grant Mahy

      It could be because Aboriginals lower pain tolerance, opposed to others who have a higher pain tolerance therefore require less medication than Aboriginals? They've shown women have a higher pain tolerance than men. They shown Asians and redheads have a lower pain tolerance. What is the mode of operation of pain killers ?
      Binding iron.
      "A chelate theory for aspirin-like drugs"
      What do all those different people have in common?
      Redhead pigment is the result of iron , Aboriginals / Pacific Islanders have increased iron , and men have higher iron levels than women because women have monthly bloodletting.
      "Higher TS and SF levels in persons of Asian or Pacific Island heritage"

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    2. Grant Mahy

      Unemployed

      In reply to Tom Hennessy

      So are you saying it's a genetic thing? Sort of like different shaped skulls?

      Actually, I'm Maori, so Pacific Islander really because, for instance, I'm Tainui Iwi whose origins can be traced back to the Cook Islands. Never use aspirin, paracetamol etc. Never in fact, not for over 20 or more years. I have an incredibly high pain threshold. So I think that theory may need some more work.

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    3. Brendan Smith

      Masters of Sustainability student at Monash Universiy

      In reply to Grant Mahy

      I wanted to follow up from our other article because there we a few points that did not make sense. I have never said we should treat asylum seekers inhumanely. What does annoy me is people making assumptions of other people- I have never said I wanted an $80,000yr job I said 'meaningful' employment which could be cleaning dishes or some $20k job however I would feel like that I am not making a contribution to society because this work does not reflect my skill level. As a student of human rights…

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    4. Grant Mahy

      Unemployed

      In reply to Brendan Smith

      Brendan glad you got that off your chest. Somewhat off topic for sure. As I said, I wish you the best getting the job that you would like.

      Certainly Australia needs to look hard at some of it's policies that support the rich and greatly disadvantage the have nots. Things such as unaffordable housing and rents and rapidly escalating prices for food, petrol etc. Basically, Australia now is a country where only rich kids by the large can afford an education, or if you have to support yourself while…

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    5. Tom Hennessy

      Retired

      In reply to Grant Mahy

      "So I think that theory may need some more work."

      The study found Asians and Pacific Islanders have the highest mean iron levels than anyone tested. It didn't say they attribute it to an unrecognised genetic iron overload , just that they have the highest iron. The same with women , we know they have lower iron levels than men. Redhead pigment is iron based. How , any of those people gain this iron excess is still a matter of debate , but , as pointed out they are 'connected' through the iron…

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    6. Tom Hennessy

      Retired

      In reply to Tom Hennessy

      "Asians, Pacific Islanders Have Highest Blood Iron Levels"
      http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/04/050430222454.htm

      "There were statistically significant ethnic group differences in pain scores (P = 1.7 x 10(-7)) and morphine usage (P = 2.8 x 10(-15)) between ethnic groups, with Indians having the highest mean pain score and using the highest amount of morphine."
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18550441

      "The iron pigments extracted with boiling acids from human red hair and chicken…

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    7. Grant Mahy

      Unemployed

      In reply to Tom Hennessy

      Yeah I guess I'm still wondering what this all has to do with pain threshold cause like hey bro don't know if you've noticed but us Maori fellahs (i.e. Pacific Islander genetics) tend to be pretty tough. Sort of why NZ with a population of just over 4 million kills Australia in the rugby lol. Don't know if you've ever played rugby but I can assure you if you don't have a high pain threshold you're well hmmm in a world of pain. Sort of like how brown and black people are dynamite boxers - guess it's because they're afraid of pain and good at ducking:-) Point being, sarcasm (I apologise) aside I think your theory is pooh.

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    8. Grant Mahy

      Unemployed

      In reply to Grant Mahy

      Ah yeah and those Asians and Muay Thai - now there are some seriously tough muthas. So what exactly has iron got to do with pain again? I mean women right - if it were upto men to give birth there would be no babies. Women are seriously tough when it comes to pain threshold.

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    9. Grant Mahy

      Unemployed

      In reply to Tom Hennessy

      Haha I'm still very confused - I think this theory needs more work. Is it peer reviewed?

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    10. Tom Hennessy

      Retired

      In reply to Grant Mahy

      The theory is , somehow , since pain killers are iron binders , and those groups with low iron are less susceptible to pain then in order to kill the pain one would have to take higher doses of pain killers and ibuprophen is known to cause damage in some people. Would this damage be the same damage being referred to in the article , OTC pain killers being a problem in Pacific Islanders? Would Pacific Islanders do more pain killers therefore having everyone say they are going to do damage becasue they seem to do more OTC pain killers than usual ?

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    11. Tom Hennessy

      Retired

      In reply to Grant Mahy

      "Is it peer reviewed?"

      Peer reviewed ? To give an example of peer reviewing , when I first put forth the iron in diabetes link , the argument was it needed no peer reviewing because everyone with diabetes was anemic , therefore the theory everyone with diabetes being / having iron excess was simply .. impossible .. no chance whatsoever so why would peer reviewing be necessary , let alone , considered at all ? Then , a few years later , they find 92% long term diabetics have free floating iron…

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    12. Grant Mahy

      Unemployed

      In reply to Tom Hennessy

      Okay I'm peer reviewing. Seems a bit flakey based on your theory that people who have a high threshold for pain should have a lower threshold for pain due to elevated iron levels. Asians, Pacific Islanders, Maori, and Women seem to handle pain far better than the people your theory suggests should have a higher threshold to pain because of lower iron levels. So back to Indigenous Australians - the use of pain killers may be related to them needing to kill psychological pain (numb their genocide if you will)

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    13. Tom Hennessy

      Retired

      In reply to Grant Mahy

      "pain killers may be related to them needing to kill psychological pain"

      Obviously , you are wrong , because pain and psychological pain are two different pathways , depression , pain and if you look closely , noone anywhere has ever used a pain killer to get over no beer in the fridge , not OTC pain killers anyhow.

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    14. Grant Mahy

      Unemployed

      In reply to Tom Hennessy

      Okay so now you've attributed a different physical attribute to Indigenous Ausrtralians and put them together with alcohol. What's wrong with this picture?

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    15. Tom Hennessy

      Retired

      In reply to Tom Hennessy

      One method to test a hypothesis is the links between known iron caused diseases and iron linked diseases? Would the rate of Reye's syndrome be higher in those with iron excess? Reye's syndrome has evidence , aspirin chelating iron , and Reye's is caused by aspirin. So is the oxidation caused by the aspirin the reason for Reye's ? The removal of the iron , bound poorly , leaving residual iron to oxidise ? So, in those with Reye's do they begin with higher iron levels then they 'caught' Reye's due to the use of aspirin? If that were the case there should be a higher rate of Reye's in people who use OTC aspirin , ibuprophen , etc because of their increased iron and since there IS a higher rate of diabetes , and iron has been linked to diabetes , then one would expect too , a higher rate of Reye's , in that population you are studying?

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    16. Tom Hennessy

      Retired

      In reply to Grant Mahy

      Yikes , I may have to retract my statement , aspirin for depression.
      "A GROWING group of "re-purposed" anti-inflammatory medications are combating depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, with scientists dubbing research findings a "paradigm shift" in the treatment of mental illness."
      http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/treasury/findings-provide-new-explanation-of-how-many-mental-disorders-develop/story-fni7plpm-1226641560990

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    17. Tom Hennessy

      Retired

      In reply to Grant Mahy

      "Asians, Pacific Islanders, Maori, and Women seem to handle pain far better than the people your theory suggests"

      That is what reviewers call , anecdotal , one person's vocal observation through contact sports. It doesn't mean all meat eaters can't take a hit , due to the fact I haven't met a red headed step child who couldn't take a punch. The article , I am supposing , is based on an observation , the observation being , 'jeez it seems this population is using higher than average ibuprophen' , per case ? , did they interview the patients or did they just do 'inventory' and notice , as they noticed in Norway with antidepressant use , that the use of ibuprophen in New Zealand , period , was / is higher ?

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    18. Grant Mahy

      Unemployed

      In reply to Tom Hennessy

      Funny how anecdotal stuff goes. They should use the codeine based pain killers - works even better for killing depression. Codeine and heroin are very similar (actually codeine can easily be turned into 'home bake heroin'. Heroin is a dynamite pain killer - like going through life wrapped in cotton wool.

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    19. Tom Hennessy

      Retired

      In reply to Grant Mahy

      I hate to say , it sounds like you know heroin from the inside out , and as the article says , Maori use painkillers a bit more than the rest of us , and by the sounds of it , they are right , anecdotally.

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    20. Grant Mahy

      Unemployed

      In reply to Tom Hennessy

      Nope used to work in heroin overdose back in the late nineties. Hmm maybe Maori use more painkillers because of high iron levels and lack of beer in the fridge.

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    21. Tom Hennessy

      Retired

      In reply to Grant Mahy

      Since Maori have been found with high iron levels , and since pain killers work by targeting iron , it may not be that far of a stretch to think a person with high iron levels may be FORCED by those high iron levels to consume MORE of a substance which works by binding of iron. As to the reference to beer , it was in reference to depression. If a person cannot afford beer , one gets depressed and you say one would grab an OTC ibuprophen to tamper that depression , but I disagreed , in that , I'd never heard of anyone using a OTC painkiller for depression , I've heard of under the counter , heroin , morphine , tylenol 3 , etc , but never OTC for depression.

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    22. Grant Mahy

      Unemployed

      In reply to Tom Hennessy

      I'm going to get my iron levels checked but we have also established that OTC may work with depression. Maori are like Indigenous Australians only with worse weather. Ah and yeah worse beer - don't even get me started about DB Brown and Lion Red and that urine Steinlager (the Germans would be up in arms about it).

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  2. Tom Hennessy

    Retired

    "Acetaminophen may be useful for treatment of iron-induced pathology"

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