Articles on Central African Republic

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Nigerian soldiers clearing Boko Haram camps in Borno State. The government has contracted private security companies to help. EPA/Stringer

Peeling back the layers on the role of private security companies in Africa

Private military and security companies are increasingly being contracted in Africa. But there are big gaps in understanding their impact.
A global survey claims South Africans don’t trust their police. EPA/Nic Bothma

Why the global survey on safety is deeply flawed

The Law and Order Index says South Africans feel less secure than people in Yemen, the DRC and Libya, countries all affected by violent conflict.
French President Emmanuel Macron during his visit to French counter-terrorism forces in northern Mali, in May. EPA/Christophe Petit Tesson

What drives instability in Africa and what can be done about it

Some African countries present a facade of democracy. The absence of substantive democracy is contributing to instability on the continent.
Many girls in Dar es Salaam’s slums drop out of school because of the costs involved. ICT4D.at/Flickr

Jobs and paid-for schooling can keep Tanzanian girls from early marriages

Creating more opportunities for young women and girls to work and earn money is a possible solution to early marriages. Subsidising secondary education to keep poorer girls in school is another.
Central African Republic President Faustin-Archange Touadera inspects a guard of honor in Ivory Coast. Legnan Koula/EPA

For the Central African Republic there will be no peace without justice

Since civil war broke out in the Central African Republic four years ago, citizens continue to live in fear. They say that peace will only come when the war criminals are brought to justice.
Nelson Mandela (right), with former Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat, saw human rights as central to South Africa’s foreign affairs. Reuters

South Africa’s foreign policy has been at sixes and sevens – here’s why

South Africa's decision to leave the ICC suggests that its foreign policy is caught in a dilemma between lofty ideas, an unsettled identity crisis, and shifting priorities in a complex world.

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