Articles on Child birth

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Birth centres are a good option for women with low-risk pregnancies, but availability is limited. Lolostock/Shutterstock

Having a baby at a birth centre is as safe as hospital but results in less intervention

Compared to women who give birth in a birth centre, those who give birth in hospitals are much more likely to have interventions – from epidurals, to labour augmentation and caesarean deliveries.
By the time they turn one, half of Australian babies have had a course of antibiotics. Shutterstock

Antibiotics before birth and in early life can affect long-term health

There may be additional long-term health harms from antibiotic exposure in early life and before birth, including an increased risk of infection, obesity and asthma.
Intervention will sometimes be required in childbirth, but should only occur when medically necessary. Circlephoto/Shutterstock

How birth interventions affect babies’ health in the short and long term

Our study found babies born via medical or surgical intervention were at increased risk of health problems, from jaundice and feeding issues, to diabetes, respiratory infections and eczema.
The mode of delivery has a big impact on an infant’s microbiota, the bacteria that live in the gut. Martin Valigursky/Shutterstock

Gut instinct: how the way you’re born and fed affect your immune system

The particular makeup of a newborn’s gut microbes is important as it has been shown to affect their risk of developing certain diseases later in childhood and adulthood.

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