Articles on Climate change

Displaying 21 - 40 of 2103 articles

Smart phones are rarely recycled and that’s just one reason tech devices are increasing our carbon footprints. Here Phil Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of worldwide marketing, is seen in 2016 talking about new iPhones. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

How smartphones are heating up the planet

New research shows the impact of technology, especially smartphones, on carbon emissions. Encouraging consumers to get new phones every couple of years leads to extraordinary and unnecessary waste.
A new report finds concerns about water infrastructure tops the list for Canada’s water providers. (Shutterstock)

Understanding the risks to Canada’s drinking water

World Water Day shines a light on the importance of safe, clean drinking water, but a new report finds Canada's freshwater systems are under stress.
Thelazia gulosa is an eyeworm parasite that infects cows. But an Oregon woman’s discovery of the worms in her own eye has raised concerns about parasites that jump from animals to humans. (Shutterstock)

How animal parasites find a home in humans

A stomach-churning viral video of an Oregon woman who describes removing cattle eyeworms from her eye has renewed interest in parasites that jump from animals to humans. Here's all you need to know.
The increasingly bleached coral at Black Point on the Cobourg Peninsula is a worrying sign of what’s to come for other coral reefs in Australia. Alan Withers

New coral bleaching outbreak in NT a worrying sign of our warming oceans

Coral bleaching has struck the Northern Territory, adding urgency to the need for better national management strategies for our warming oceans.
The IPCC’s first cities conference revealed the challenges in bridging the gaps between scientific knowledge and policy practice, and between cities in developed and developing nations. Cities IPCC/Twitter

IPCC cities conference tackles gaps between science and climate action on the ground

The first IPCC conference on cities has highlighted the challenges of reconciling science, urban practices and politics. But it was an important recognition of cities' leading role in climate action.
The language that you speak may affect your approach to climate change. from www.shutterstock.com

Future tense: how the language you speak influences your willingness to take climate action

Research suggests that speakers of "present-tensed" languages such as German and Finnish - in which the future can be describe in the present tense - are more likely to support stronger climate policies.
Homes are surrounded by floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey in Spring, Texas on Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)

Why some conservatives are blind to climate change

Despite strong evidence that human activities have altered the climate, not everyone sees the risks. New research explains why some people seem blind to the signs of climate change.

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