Articles on Evolution

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The living coelacanth in its natural environment off the South African coast. Laurent Ballesta, Gombessa expeditions, Andromede Oceanology Ltd (from the book Gombessa, meeting with the coelacanth)

We scanned one of our closest cousins, the coelacanth, to learn how its brain grows

The discovery of a living coelacanth fish rocked the world in 1939, as scientists thought they had died out with the dinosaurs. A new study illuminates how its skull and tiny brain develop.
Reversing lactose intolerance might make it possible for adults to enjoy a milkshake again. YAKOBCHUK VIACHESLAV / Shutterstock.com

Can changing the microbiome reverse lactose intolerance?

You may think that your milk-drinking, ice cream-licking days are behind you as you battle the discomfort of lactose intolerance. But there maybe be a way to reverse the situation.
New research shows dolphins have a large clitoris that is similar to the human organ. from www.shutterstock.com

All female mammals have a clitoris – we’re starting to work out what that means for their sex lives

It was not until the late 1990s that the anatomy of the human clitoris was accurately described by Australia’s first female urologist. And now research in animals is starting to catch up.
A modern mouse lemur Microcebus sits upon the cranium of an extinct Megaladapis lemur. Dao Van Hoang www.daovanhoang.com

Last of the giants: What killed off Madagascar’s megafauna a thousand years ago?

A series of new studies sheds light on the population crash and extinction of the giant birds, lemurs and more that roamed the island until around A.D. 700-1000.
A modern arthropod (the centipede Cormocephalus) crawls over its Cambrian ‘flatmate’ (the trilobite Estaingia). Michael Lee / South Australian Museum and Flinders University

Life quickly finds a way: the surprisingly swift end to evolution’s big bang

Modern animals took over our planet much more quickly than previously thought. This has both welcome and disturbing implications for the future of life on our rapidly changing planet

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