Articles on Filibuster

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‘Candidate’ has its roots in the word ‘candid’, to be frank. It’s hard not to believe that we’ve strayed a little from those noble aspirations. Cesare Maccari/Wikimedia Commons

From donkey votes to dog whistles, our election language has a long and political history

Many of the most commonly used election terms have a long linguistic history, stretching from ancient Rome to modern-day America and Australia.
‘As president, I will repeal every word of Obamacare,’ Ted Cruz proclaimed during the Feburary 25 GOP debate. Mike Stone/Reuters

How difficult would it be to repeal Obamacare for good?

The leading GOP candidates all claim one of their top priorities will be to repeal Obamacare. An architect of the original law outlines the thorny – but plausible – path to repeal.
President Obama addresses a joint session of Congress in 2009 Lawrence Jackson

Filibusters make for strange bedfellows

When Republicans took over Congress, many observers predicted a goodbye to gridlock. Not so fast, however. Politicians say they hate filibusters -- until they want to use them.
Barack Obama has signed into law all but two of the bills to come before him, but is likely to use his power of presidential veto more often in the final two years of his term. White House/Pete Souza

US votes for presidential vetoes, filibusters and partisan fractures

Perhaps no sentiment better defines the American political psyche than distrust of government. It prompted the constitutional framers 226 years ago to create a system of national government that separates…

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