Articles on Genocide

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Tony Abbott has twice compared Islamic State to the Nazis, but does that aid our understanding of terrorism and what needs to be done to defeat it? AAP/Richard Wainwright

When words fail: comparing Islamic State to the Nazis misses the mark

We need to find ways of speaking about the horrific actions of Islamic State that help, not hinder, understanding of the magnitude of those crimes and what needs to be done to combat them.
There are lessons to be learnt about the ICC from the Kellogg-Briand Pact, signed in 1928. It failed to prevent the outbreak of war but brought war criminals to justice later. Reuters

ICC: sad lesson of lofty ideals trumped by reality repeats itself

The ICC has not lived up to its noble intentions of making the world more just. Its failure echoes that of the 1928 Kellogg-Briand Pact, which set out to banish wars and to settle disputes peacefully.
A judgment by South Africa’s Constitutional Court unambiguously set out South Africa’s legal obligations. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

Al-Bashir: what the law says about South Africa’s duties

The South African government’s failure to arrest Omar al-Bashir flies in the face of the Constitutional Court’s decision in 2014 that South Africa has a duty to abide by its international obligations.
A child cries in a cave shelter in Tess village in the rebel-held territory of the Nuba Mountains in South Kordofan. Countless children have been killed by government forces. Goran Tomasevic/Reuters

The world’s unexplained silence over human tragedy in the Nuba Mountains of Sudan

Countless Nuba children have been killed by shrapnel, others from a loss of blood pouring from severed limbs. Others have stepped on landmines planted by Sudan's troops.
Does relentlessly criticising Australia’s human rights record risk doing more harm than good? Courntey Biggs/AAP

Is Australia as bad as IS? Skewed criticism may leave you wondering

Australia's human rights record isn't perfect, but it still good. if Australians aren't able to take some pride in that and be inspired to do even better, over-the-top criticism could backfire.
Almost half-a-million newly displaced people have in the past year followed the two million who took refuge in camps after violence erupted in Darfur in 2003. EPA/Olivier Chassot/UNAMID

Retreating from Darfur? A decade on, spectre of atrocities returns

News media have been reporting widespread atrocities by Boko Haram against as many as 2000 civilians in Nigeria. But a similar escalation of violence in Darfur, Sudan, over the past two months has been…
Known as White Rocks, this quartz outcrop was the site of a three-hour gun battle in 1915 between police and two Afghans, who had shot and killed picnickers leaving Broken Hill. Amanda Slater/Flickr

History repeating: from the Battle of Broken Hill to the sands of Syria

It’s another hot Australian New Year’s Day, and 1200 people are aboard a train bound for a picnic when a burst of gunfire shatters the festive atmosphere. Police return fire, killing the attackers – but…
Symbols such as the monument of the slain Indonesian generals continue to propagate Suharto’s version of events to today’s Indonesian youth. Chez Julius Livre 1/Flickr

Breaking the silence around the 1965 Indonesian genocide

Next year it will be 50 years since a group of middle-ranking army officers abducted the top brass of the Indonesian army. They had planned to bring them before President Sukarno, as they had heard rumours…
Richard Mosse, ‘A Thousand Plateaus’. © Richard Mosse, courtesy Edel Assanti

Another planet? Photographing conflict in eastern Congo

In an extraordinary moment at the Eichmann trial, an Auschwitz survivor who gave himself the name Ka-Tzetnick (from the German initials for concentration camp) described the world into which millions were…
Running out of time: Khmer Rouge defendant Nuon Chea. Wikimedia Commons

Cambodia hurries to prosecute ageing Khmer Rouge leaders

More than 30 years after they were deposed, the leaders of Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge are on trial in the country they once ruled. The body set up to prosecute them, the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts…
Never again: Holocaust survivor Ben Helfgott. Anthony Devlin/PA

Honour Holocaust victims by acknowledging rise of race hate

We rarely ask ourselves why we should remember the Holocaust. We simply assume that we should. However, if we only go through the motions uttering phrases such as “we remember” and “never again”, remembering…

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