Articles on Heat

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Some materials and surfaces radiate much more heat (red areas) than others, as can be seen in this thermal image of Arncliffe Street in Wolli Creek, Sydney.

Building cool cities for a hot future

Hot spots occur at the scale of where people live – the building, the street, the block – which means urban design and building materials have profound implications for our health and well-being.
Bushfires and heatwaves are expected to increase and significantly impact on Australian cities and urban communities. AAP/Tracey Nearmy

Hot cities: the ‘smart’ response to urban heat threats

How well does the 'smart' city respond to the devastating scale and impact of urban heat threats such as bushfires and heatwaves?
The cover that trees provide transforms cities into much more hospitable places, especially in hot weather. AAP/Joe Castro

In a heatwave, the leafy suburbs are even more advantaged

Six years after Black Saturday, it's worth remembering that heatwaves kill more people than bushfires do, so shade can be a life-saver. But tree cover and shade are not evenly distributed in cities.
Magnets have mysterious powers – now shown to influence heat and sound. Magnet image via

Magnetic fields can control heat and sound

Sound waves are made of particles called phonons. New research shows they're affected by magnetic fields, with researchers able to steer heat magnetically.
If you’re not regularly active, extreme exercise and exercise in extreme heat is unwise. lzf/Shutterstock

Health Check: how to exercise safely in the heat

Exercise alone can be hard, but exercising in the heat is a whole lot harder. Put simply, this is due to the balance between how much heat the body generates and how much it is capable of losing.
Well, maybe it’s not quite this electrifying, but the prototype is pretty cool. Florian F. (Flowtography)/Flickr

Flat battery? New prototype turns waste heat into electricity

Picture a device that can produce electricity using nothing but the ambient heat around it. Thanks to research published…
Heat relief: on hot days, flying foxes - like this grey-headed flying fox - dip their bellies into water to cool down. Nick Edards

Killer climate: tens of thousands of flying foxes dead in a day

This summer we have seen one of the most dramatic animal die-offs ever recorded in Australia: at least 45,500 flying foxes dead on just one extremely hot day in southeast Queensland, according to our new…
Deep underground the coal is off - but the heat is still on. Ashley Dace

Underground water heat will aid bid to hit renewable targets

Solar and wind power rightly receive a lot of attention as we struggle to ramp up renewable electricity and move away from fossil fuels. But in a damp, blustery island such as ours, generating heat is…

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