Articles on Humanitarian aid

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Clashes between opposition protesters and Venezuelan soldiers at the Venezuela-Brazil border have killed an estimated 25 people. AP Photo/Edmar Barros

Brazil and Venezuela clash over migrants, humanitarian aid and closed borders

Brazil's president has threatened military intervention in neighboring Venezuela, called its leader a 'dictator' and sent troops to the border. But Brazil's military is quietly working to avoid war.
Some 5,000 Venezuelans flee the country’s violence, tyranny and hunger every day, creating an historic migration crisis that rivals Syria’s. AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana

Trump sees opportunity in Venezuela’s humanitarian crisis as midterms approach

Trump has called Venezuela a 'human tragedy' and threatened invasion while quietly deporting and denying asylum to Venezuelan refugees. His anti-socialist rhetoric may make for good midterm politics.
The flood damage from Hurricane Harvey, including this Friendswood, Texas, house, will take years to repair. AP Photo/David J. Phillip

Want to help after a disaster? Consider waiting a bit

The urge to provide disaster aid is borne out of the best characteristics of humanity. But it's important to consider when to donate to disaster survivors, along with what and to whom to give.
Loading new furniture donated to Hurricane Irma survivors in Chokoloskee, Fla.

Sending help where it’s needed most after disasters

The billions of dollars worth of aid dispatched every year to alleviate the suffering and damage after earthquakes and hurricanes would do more good if it didn't get clumped up.
Some 17,000 U.S. troops aided in the Caribbean relief effort after hurricanes Irma and Maria. That’s roughly equivalent to the U.S. military’s humanitarian mission in the Philippines after Typhoon Hiyan in 2013. U.S. Department of Agriculture

Military mission in Puerto Rico after hurricane was better than critics say but suffered flaws

Compared to its foreign disaster missions, the US military mobilized slowly after Maria. But in numbers, capacity and logistics coordination, its work in Puerto Rico was on par with other aid efforts.

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