Articles on Hurricanes

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Extreme flooding during Hurricane Maria in 2017 was hazardous for the Puerto Rican people. But a new study finds that it helped native fish populations rebound after years of drought. AP Photo/Alvin Baez

Caribbean fish love catastrophic hurricanes

Big storms with lots of flooding, like hurricanes Dorian and Maria, actually restore the Caribbean's delicate balance between native and nonnative fish species, new research finds.
High surf in Vero Beach, Fla. in advance of Hurricane Dorian. AP Photo/Gerald Herbert

Good communication is a key part of disaster response

Social media make it easier to push information out quickly during disasters, but also create challenges for public information officers, who have to judge which reports are credible enough to share.
Shoppers prepare ahead of Hurricane Dorian in Pembroke, Florida. AP Photo/Brynn Anderson

Preparing for hurricanes: 3 essential reads

As Hurricane Dorian approaches Florida, we share three articles on predicting hurricanes' paths and evacuating from harm's way.
The nursing home in Hollywood Hills, Fla., where 12 people died after the center lost power from Hurricane Irma in 2017. mpi122/MediaPunch/IPX/AP Photo

Hurricane evacuation of nursing home residents still an unsolved challenge

Hurricane season presents special dangers for elders, particularly for those in nursing homes and assisted living. Research indicates sheltering-in-place may actually be less risky than evacuating, at times.
In this November 2013, photo, Typhoon Haiyan survivors pass by hundreds of victims in body bags near Tacloban, Philippines. Haiyan left more than 7,300 people dead or missing. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

Myths about disaster survivors stall the global response to climate change

The Haiyan Typhoon disaster is a cautionary case for climate adaptation and mitigation because it demonstrates the seductiveness of survival myths.
Surf threatens beach houses on Dauphin Island, Alabama, September 4, 2011 during Tropical Storm Lee. AP Photo/Dave Martin

Why are Atlantic and Gulf coast property owners building back bigger after hurricanes?

'Building back better' refers to making communities more disaster-proof and resilient after they take a hit. But instead, some US owners are building back bigger homes in vulnerable places.
A Monmouth County, N.J. home in 2015. Jack L. Harris

It takes years to fully recover from big storms like Sandy

Getting everyone whose lives were thrown off-track back takes a lot of personal effort, paired with work done by a constantly shifting mix of nonprofits and governmental agencies over many years.
Debris in a boatyard in Mexico Beach, Fla., on Oct. 11, 2018, after Hurricane Michael heavily damaged the town. AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File

Getting ready for hurricane season: 4 essential reads

For the start of Atlantic hurricane season on June 1, scholars explain weather forecasting, evacuation orders, inland flooding risks and how social ties influence decisions to stay or flee.
Flood waters cover large tracts of land in Mozambique after cyclone Idai made landfall. Rapidly rising floodwaters have cut off thousands of families from aid organizations. (World Food Programme via AP)

Hurricanes to deliver a bigger punch to coasts

Climate change is making hurricanes more destructive, and may have boosted the intensity of cyclone Idai that hit Mozambique, Zambia and Malawi.

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