Articles on Immune system

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If they are simply too large, your tonsils can be shrunk down using special instruments which remove the valleys and crypts. Shutterstock

Curious Kids: Why do we have tonsils?????

Tonsil tissue is particularly important in the first six months of life. After this, our lymph glands take over most of the work and the tonsils are essentially out of a job.
By the time they turn one, half of Australian babies have had a course of antibiotics. Shutterstock

Antibiotics before birth and in early life can affect long-term health

There may be additional long-term health harms from antibiotic exposure in early life and before birth, including an increased risk of infection, obesity and asthma.
Bats are the only mammals capable of true flight. Scientists believe flight may influence their immune responses to coronoviruses, which cause fatal diseases such as SARS and MERS in humans. (Shutterstock)

Can bats help humans survive the next pandemic?

Scientific studies show that bats may carry "coronoviruses" causing SARS and MERS - without showing symptoms of disease. Could the bat immune system be key to human survival in future pandemics?
A recent study of medical students and residents found they were reluctant to engage with parents who have vaccination fears. But listening to parents is important. Olena Yakobchuck/Shutterstock.com

The best shot at overcoming vaccination standoffs? Having doctors listen to – not shun – reluctant parents

A recent study suggests that shunning parents who are reluctant to vaccinate their kids isn't the best strategy. A better strategy might be old-fashioned, but it works.
Parents are concerned combination vaccines, which protect against several diseases at once, can be too much for a young immune system to cope with. from www.shutterstock.com

No, combination vaccines don’t overwhelm kids’ immune systems

Vaccines against multiple diseases in one jab strengthen kids' immune systems, not weaken them. Here's why we shouldn't fear these combination vaccines.
A virus like SARS can shut down cytokine production, enabling it to multiply to higher levels and causing significant infection and even death. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kevin Frayer)

Explainer: How the human body first fights off pathogens

We've all endured infections. Here's how it works when our bodies are attacked by viruses, bacteria or parasites, and our innate immune system becomes the first line of defence.

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