Articles on Impeachment

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Mueller testifies before the House Intelligence Committee. Reuters/Alex Brandon

The Mueller hearing and the death of facts

To one scholar of the post-truth era, tuning in to Robert Mueller's testimony Wednesday was to hear a duel over the facts. Not what the facts imply – but what the facts are.
U.S. President Donald Trump. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

The 25th Amendment wouldn’t work to dump Trump

Those who want President Trump out of office should forget about the 25th Amendment; it won’t work as they hope or believe. The amendment is a complex law that – by design – is very hard to use.
President Donald Trump arriving at the Rose Garden, May 22, 2019, in Washington. AP/Evan Vucci

The Constitution dictates that impeachment must not be partisan

Politics have pervaded the debate about whether Congress should impeach President Trump. One legal scholar says that whether to impeach – or not – should not be viewed as a political question.
Attorney General William Barr at an April 18 press conference about the public release of the special counsel’s report on Donald Trump. AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

What happens next with the Mueller report? 3 essential reads

The full report on the special counsel's Trump investigation has now been made public. As people, Congress and prosecutors nationwide dig into Mueller's findings, here are three key issues to watch.
Attorney General William Barr at an April 18 press conference about the public release of the special counsel’s report on Donald Trump. AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

What you need to know about the Mueller report: 4 essential reads

As the special counsel's investigation of Trump turns into a partisan battle in Congress, here are four key issues to follow.
Special counsel Robert Mueller reached no definitive conclusion about whether President Donald Trump obstructed justice in firing FBI Director James Comey or attacking his own investigation. Reuters/Hyungwon Kang, AP Photo/Susan Walsh, Reuters/Jonathan Ernst, Twitter

Trump and obstruction of justice: An explainer

Legally, a person can obstruct justice even if he committed no other crime – though it is harder to prove. It all depends on the intent behind pressuring investigators, say, or firing an FBI director.
The line of succession works like this: If Trump is removed from office, Pence takes over. If both Trump and Pence go, Pelosi would take over. AP Photo/Evan Vucci

The new Congress likely won’t impeach Trump and remove him from office – here’s why

Democrats control the House and could impeach Trump if they wanted. But removing the president from office is in the hands of the Senate -- which is still dominated by Republicans.
With the Democrats favoured to win back the House of Representatives in the midterm elections, that makes impeachment of Trump more likely, right? Shawn Thew/EPA

Calculating the odds of a Trump impeachment: don’t bet the house on it

If the Democrats get close to retaking the House of Representatives in the midterm elections, the odds of impeachment are high. But the Senate remains problematic.
U.S. President Donald Trump during a campaign rally in Topeka, Kan., Oct. 6, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

From Caesar to Trump: Immunity is a hard thing to give up

US law says the president can't be indicted, an echo of ancient Roman law. The efforts Roman leader Julius Caesar made to maintain his immunity is a cautionary tale for America's political system.
What are the ethics of anonymous resistance? Vincent Diamante

Why the anonymous op-ed sets a dangerous precedent

An expert argues why the anonymous op-ed in The New York Times can hardly be considered an act of civil disobedience and why it might make things even worse in the Trump administration.
Rob Rosenstein suggested invoking the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from power in Spring 2017, according to the New York Times. Reuters/Leah Millis

What the 25th Amendment says about presidents who are ‘unable’ to serve

The US Constitution allows the president to be removed from power if his vice president and Cabinet decide that he cannot discharge the duties of his office.
Trump’s long-time lawyer and political ‘fixer’ has pleaded guilty to breaking two campaign finance laws, allegedly at the direction of the president. Reuters/Jonathan Ernst

There’s a dark history to the campaign finance laws Michael Cohen broke — and that should worry Trump

Trump's former personal lawyer broke two laws that control political spending, both passed after major election scandals. President Roosevelt survived his campaign's misdeeds. Nixon did not.
Trump with the men who would replace him – Vice President Mike Pence on the left and House Speaker Paul Ryan on the left. Win McNamee/AP Pool

Why Trump hasn’t been impeached – and likely won’t be

The president won't be removed from office until Republicans in the House decide to support the idea – or the midterms hand the Democrats more seats.
President Donald Trump delivers remarks at the Pentagon on January 18, 2018. Dominique A. Pineiro/Flickr

A friendly reminder: impeaching Donald Trump will not remove him from office

Not a day passes without fresh speculation about the possible impeachment of Donald Trump, but history indicates that – barring a dramatic turn of events – he is likely to serve out his first term.
‘Farewell, to all my greatness’ — President Andrew Johnson’s departure from office was lampooned by Harper’s Weekly. Library of Congress

Andrew Johnson’s failed presidency echoes in Trump’s White House

A historian looks back at Andrew Johnson's unlikely and unsuccessful presidency and why he wasn't cut out for the job.

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