Articles on Malheur occupation

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Harney County residents gather to protest the FBI’s presence at the airport in Burns, Oregon, January 31, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart

The Federal response in Malheur and far right extremism

Race may have played a role in the muted federal response to the standoff at Malheur Wildlife Refuge, but it goes deeper than that.
Members of various militia groups met in the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon. One dressed as a Continental army officer. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart

The Bundys think they are preserving democracy by occupying Oregon’s Malheur refuge, but they are undermining it

The notion of civil rebellion – like the one at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge – is at the heart of the Second Amendment. But so is the idea that such rebellions should not be undertaken lightly.
The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) was often referred to as the Bureau of Livestock and Mining in the 19th century. U.S. Bureau of Land Management

The twisted roots of U.S. land policy in the West

What explains the anger behind the Malheur occupation in Oregon, and why does the BLM own so much land in the West?
The Malheur National Wildlife Refuge is part of a complicated history of land in the western US. US Fish and Wildlife Service

Malheur occupation in Oregon: whose land is it really?

Like much federal land in the US West, the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge has a long history tied to Native Americans’ plight and conflicts between settlers and the federal government.

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