Articles on Marikana

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A protester smokes marijuana during a march calling for the legalisation of cannabis in Cape Town. Reuters/Mike Hutchings

Below the radar, South Africa is limiting the right to protest

Despite protests in South Africa being largely peaceful, municipalities are placing unreasonable restrictions on the right to protest, which sometimes amounts to a veto of that right.
Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe and his wife Grace. Mugabe has been in power since 1980. Reuters/Philimon Bulawayo

How liberators turn into oppressors: a study of southern African states

It is normal for resistance movements to adopt rough survival strategies and techniques while fighting an oppressive regime. Unfortunately that culture takes root and is permanently nurtured.
Workers in a bank watch as Occupy Wall Street protesters march in New York as part of the populist movement protesting economic inequality. Reuters/Joshua Lott

Why inequality matters – for the rich and the poor

The Marikana tragedy has indicated the violent nature of the struggles over resources and income shares. Inequality must be fought because it perpetuates social injustice.
It may seem like photographer Greg Marinovich captured a bare landscape in his photos of Marikana, but the dreary photos are filled with haunting memories of the massacre that took place there. © Greg Marinovich

Marikana artwork provides a tool for conscientisation

The Marikana tragedy has dominated recent South African memory and produced many different aesthetic responses.
The Farlam Commission found that the police inappropriately chose to forcibly break the strike at Marikana, resulting in the deaths of 34 miners. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

Marikana: shining the light on police militarisation and brutality in South Africa

The Farlam Commission has called for implementation of plans to demilitarise the police to prevent a recurrence of the Marikana massacre. But, no-one, including Farlam, has set out what this involves.

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