Articles on Nanoparticles

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Magnetotactic bacteria owe their special property to the magnetic nanoparticles they contain. Andy Tay

Magnetic bacteria and their unique superpower attract researchers

These single-celled organisms naturally respond to the Earth's weak magnetic field. Scientists are untangling how it all works, looking to future biomedical and other engineering applications.
Section of a tumor observed with an optical microscope. The two white forms with brown borders are blood vessels. Inside, gold nanoparticles accumulate against their walls. Mariana Varna-Pannerec (ESPCI)

Destroying tumors with gold nanoparticles

Gold can be used to make jewelry, but also to fight cancer. Several clinical trials are currently underway in the United States where patients are being treated with gold nanoparticles.
The health scare surrounding nanoparticles might lead to people abandoning formula unnecessarily, with serious impacts on babies’ health. from www.shutterstock.com

No, nanoparticles in baby formula will not harm your baby

A widely publicised study that cast doubt on the safety of milk formula was misleading, based on dubiously reported studies and may have serious consequences.
Achievement unlocked: Rewritable paper. Yadong Yin

Reprintable paper becomes a reality

Coating paper with an inexpensive thin film can allow users to print and erase a physical page as many as 80 times. That reduces both the cost and the environmental effects of paper use.
Without electrons there would be no electron microscopes, and therefore no close-ups like this image of pollen. Heiti Paves/Wikimedia Commons

Small world: does ecology reach all the way down to the subatomic scale?

The advent of electron microscopy and nanobiology has moved our appreciation of the living world to unprecedentedly small scales – with entirely new benefits and potential pitfalls to consider.
Some companies have used nano-titanium dioxide to make powdered sugar on donuts whiter. Shutterstock

No big deal: there is little to fear from nanoparticles in food

Two new studies from Food Standards Australia and New Zealand show there's no evidence that nanoparticles in food present a health risk, but there's more research to be done.
Substances, such as these carbon nanotubes, can behave differently at the nano-scale, and may post a health risk. ZEISS Microscopy/Flickr

Big questions about risk assessment of nanomaterials

We need to carefully assess nanomaterials to ensure their safety, but there are questions over whether the existing practice of risk assessment is up to the task.

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