Articles on Prejudice

Displaying 1 - 20 of 41 articles

A memorial outside Pittsburgh’s Tree of Life Synagogue on Oct. 29, 2018, erected after a gunman killed 11 worshippers at the temple. AP/Gene J. Puskar)

America’s dark history of organized anti-Semitism re-emerges in today’s far-right groups

American anti-Semitism took an organized form in the 20th century. The German American Bund and the Silver Legion developed a unique culture of hatred for Jews that persists today in alt-right groups.
What are your in-groups and out-groups? ksenia_bravo/Shutterstock.com

Why our brains see the world as ‘us’ versus ‘them’

Our neural circuits lead us to find comfort in those like us and unease with those who differ, resulting in a battle between reward and distrust. But these brain connections aren't the end of the story.
Introspection won’t necessarily reveal what’s going on in there. Photo by Septian simon on Unsplash

Measuring the implicit biases we may not even be aware we have

Prejudice and stereotypes are part of why social inequality persists. Social scientists use tests to measure the implicit biases people harbor and see how much they relate to actions.
Computer training can decrease children’s biases. Jeff Inglis

How to combat racial bias: Start in childhood

Racial bias is associated with dehumanizing social groups different from your own. Psychologists trained kids to differentiate individuals of another race – with lasting effects on their biases.
Disability prejudice in the classroom can teach children early on that some lives are more worthy than others. (Shutterstock)

Think disability is a tragedy? We pity you

Two university professors explore their unlikely longtime friendship, providing lessons for parents of both "abled" and disabled children today.
Muslim women hold signs to express opposition to hate crimes and rhetoric. AP Photo/Seth Wenig

Explaining the rise in hate crimes against Muslims in the US

FBI data show that in 2015 anti-Muslim hate crimes spiked to the highest level since 2001. A scholar finds political rhetoric correlates to both sharp increases and decreases in hate crime.
Two people dress up as Gaydar bots during San Francisco’s 2014 gay pride parade. Scott Schiller/flickr

Debunking the ‘gaydar’ myth

Previous studies have shown that people possess gaydar, the ability to discern who's gay and who isn't. But this research falls prey to an error that, when corrected, leads to the opposite conclusion.
People are sometimes very willing to blatantly deny others’ humanity. Wikimedia Commons

Trump and the cycle of dehumanisation

American psychologists Nour Kteily and Emile Bruneaushow how some politicians appeal to those who demonise marginalised groups, and how those groups respond with intensified hostility.

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