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A trial of 1,400 drivers across Melbourne suggests time-of-use charges can be effective in easing traffic congestion. AMPG/Shutterstock

City-wide trial shows how road use charges can reduce traffic jams

A city-wide experiment suggests well-designed road use charges could ease congestion by encouraging people to drive at different times, take other routes or use other transport.
An artist’s impression of the new river crossing to be built as part of the West Gate Tunnel project. Western Distributor Authority

Impending traffic chaos? Beware the problematic West Gate Tunnel forecasts

Melbourne's proposed road project relies on assumptions that inflate estimates of the traffic the new link will carry – but other choices about the future of transport are open to us.
Political calculations drove the Abbott and Baird governments’ decisions on investing taxpayers’ money in the WestConnex project. Nikki Short/AAP

WestConnex audit offers another $17b lesson in how not to fund infrastructure

Reckless government investment decisions are sadly the norm when it comes to transport infrastructure. Three key checks on the decision-making process can help ensure taxpayers get value for money.
Road user pricing would encourage people to take non-essential trips at a different time, or not at all. thomasthethinkengine.com

Road user charging belongs on the political agenda as the best answer for congestion management

Charging people to drive has been the dream of policy wonks – serving politicians tend to see it as political poison. So when federal minister Paul Fletcher raises it, that's a step forward.
The budget doesn’t provide either the infrastructure investment or financing details needed to flesh out the Smart Cities Plan. AAP/Mal Fairclough

City Deals still no more than a pamphlet after Budget 2016

The budget paints a picture of higher debt, little relief for growing cities crying out for infrastructure investment, and no detail of how City Deals might work to fix this.
The report criticises the state’s failure to adequately integrate the planning of land use development and transport priorities, but falls into the same trap itself. AAP/Melanie Foster

Australian Infrastructure Plan has some way to go to give our cities what they need

Infrastructure Australia's latest report is substantial but, critically, it fails to incorporate the transport thinking needed to develop more compact cities that work better for everyone.
A focus on freeways will drive Australia’s transport emissions up. Leonard John Matthews

Abbott’s transport priorities drive Australia into the past

In last week’s election, the respective contenders to lead the nation offered contrasting views on the transport future. One opted to promote urban roads and the other, urban passenger rail. We chose roads…

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