Articles on USSR

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Behrouz Kamalvandi, left, spokesman for Iran’s atomic energy agency, listens to a man wearing a surgical mask, an official with the Ahmadi Roshan nuclear site in Natanz, Iran, during a news conference on May 20, 2019. IRIB News Agency via AP

What is the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty? Here’s why it’s still important

Nearly 50 years old, the treaty has been signed by 190 countries – more than any other arms limitation treaty. But now Iran is threatening to withdraw.
In this April 2017 photo, Georgian border guards patrol a border with Georgia’s breakaway region of South Ossetia, near the village of Khurvaleti, Georgia. (AP Photo/ Shakh Aivazov)

South Ossetia: The case for international recognition

International recognition of South Ossetia would allow for increased economic, political and cultural contacts with the outside world and prevent the country from being integrated into Russia.
What does it look like when a country’s identity falls apart? Interior Design/shutterstock.com

Identicide: How demographic shifts can rip a country apart

When a country becomes more diverse, new demographic tensions may emerge between people who feel that they own their country's identity – and people who feel they've been left out.
To try and understand the Russian revolution outside of the broader social context of the time is to neglect the development of nationhood in the region. Wikicommons

World politics explainer: the Russian revolution

The Russian Revolution – an event that affected more than Russia and was more than a revolution.
The 1976 memorial at the Babi Yar massacre site only recognised Soviet victims, despite the killing of more than 30,000 Jewish people. In 1991 a Jewish memorial was installed nearby. Jennifer Boyer/Flickr

Decoding the music masterpieces: Shostakovich’s Babi Yar

On September 29 1941, Nazis murdered more than 30,000 Jews in a ravine outside Kiev. Dmitri Shostakovich's 13th Symphony, Babi Yar, is a damning critique of the Soviet Union's lack of recognition of the massacre, and a condemnation of Stalinism.
Ak Orda, the President’s Residence in Astana. Nurseit Niyazbekov

Will oil-rich Kazakhstan ever embrace democracy?

An abundance of natural resources has helped Kazakhstan attract billions in investments. Despite its booming economy, the government is unlikely to move towards democracy any time soon.

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