Articles on World Health Organization (WHO)

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Treatment has transformed the outlook for people living with HIV from almost certain death to a manageable chronic condition. Athit Perawongmetha/Reuters

The scientific journey of AIDS from despair to cautious hope

Despite the breakthroughs in HIV and AIDS research, without an effective vaccine, the world will not get to zero new infections and deaths.
The WHO has declared a state of emergency to mobilise funds for research and greater awareness. Salvatore Di Nolfi/AAP

Zika emergency status a cause for alert, not alarm

Overnight, World Health Organisation Director-General Margaret Chan declared the outbreak of Zika virus a public health emergency. So what does this mean?
Illustration of the zika virus. Zika by Shutterstock

Why it’s wrong to compare Zika to Ebola

Zika is quite different to Ebola – and experts would do well to wait before making recommendations this time.
A mosquito. Jaime Saldarriaga/Reuters

What really threatens America: Zika, cancer or ISIS?

The unfolding information about the Zika virus and saddening images of babies infected with microcephaly should really scare us all. The disease has spread “explosively” throughout the Americas, with 32…
Around 200 stillbirths could be prevented in Australia every year in the last three months of pregnancy. { pranav }/Flickr

More than 20,000 stillbirths worldwide are avoidable

Around 20,000 late-pregnancy stillbirths could have been avoided globally in 2015, according to research published in the Lancet medical journal today.
World Health Organisation director-general Margaret Chan at the launch of a new global campaign against antibiotic resistance. Reuters/Pierre Albouy

Seven hard facts we all need to swallow about antibiotics

More than 700,000 people die each year from antibiotic-resistant infections. The World Health Organisation is trying to end the age of ignorance to protect this global common good.
A pharmacist dispensing drugs at Nairobi’s Mater Hospital. Resistance to antibiotics is high in Africa. Reuters/Thomas Mukoya

Africa has a long way to go to close the gap on antibiotic resistance

Antibiotics are used extensively in Africa because of the continent's high disease burden. This also means that resistance is high. Steps are being taken to raise awareness and encourage prudent use.
The apparent seesaw in health journalism causes science fatigue in the public mind. David/Flickr

Science fatigue keeps us clinging to bad health habits

The media constantly bombards us with the latest research on a plethora of topics without much nuance on its quality or relevance. So how can we trust science if it can't seem to make up its own mind?
A report released by the World Health Organisation has ranked red meat as probably carcinogenic to humans, possibly causing bowel cancer. Supplied

Cancer and meat – too much hype?

The World Health Organisation's report on the increased cancer risk with eating processed and red meat has been met with mixed reactions.
Humans didn’t evolve to deal with the unique conditions of space travel. Bluedharma/Flickr

What medicines would we pack for a trip to Mars?

Hollywood may already have done it but when we eventually send real astronauts to Mars, what medicines should we arm them with? And will they work the same way as they do on Earth?
Improving maternal mortality and ending preventable deaths in children are some of the health targets in the Sustainable Development Goals. Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade/Flickr

More is less? Health in the Sustainable Development Goals

Health has secured its place as one of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. But without clear mechanisms to report, finance or engage other sectors, could more end up as less?

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