Articles on Zika virus

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Medical workers move a woman, who is suspected of having Ebola, upon her arrival at Meioxeiro Hospital, in Vigo, northwestern Spain, 28 October 2015. SALVADOR SAS (EPA)/ AAP

Speaking with: Peter Doherty about infectious disease pandemics

Professor Peter Doherty on infectious disease pandemics. The Conversation, CC BY-ND47.6 MB (download)
William Isdale speaks with the University of Melbourne's Professor Peter Doherty about infectious disease pandemics.
Women in rural Malawi, outside an AIDS hospital. AIDS was the first of the ‘new’ pandemic threats, after bird flu. Author provided.

How the Trump budget undercuts security risks posed by pandemics

An active outbreak of a type of bird flu in China raises concerns about worldwide pandemics. Ebola and Zika viruses still threaten. Here's why this is not the time to cut funding.
Revellers at a carnival in Sao Paulo wear mosquito masks in a reference to the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which can spread dengue and Zika on February 4, 2016. Paulo Whitaker/Reuters

Dengue virus antibodies may worsen a Zika infection

Emerging research suggests that preexisting immunity to dengue virus, which is endemic in South America, could make a subsequent Zika infection worse.
This was the year of the health review, the NDIS, and Zika virus. Images sourced from one.aap.com.au

2016, the year that was: Health + Medicine

Health spent a lot of time in the spotlight in 2016. Medicare was a major issue in Australia’s federal election and numerous government reviews into health were announced and reported.
For viruses like dengue, being injected with the pathogen as in a vaccine can open the door to secondary infections. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Explainer: what are antibodies and why are viruses like dengue worse the second time?

Our immune system protects us but when it comes to some mosquito-borne disease, it can work against us. What are the implications for the development of a Zika virus vaccine?
Cages full of hand reared yellow fever mosquitoes await research (or possibly release) Cameron Webb, NSW Health Pathology/University of Sydney

Pitting mozzies against mozzies to stop the spread of disease

Upscaling the success of emerging mosquito control technologies relies on automating the rearing and release of millions of mosquitoes. Australia is to become the testing ground for a novel strategy.
Pregnant women in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia were faced with the double fear of dying from Ebola as well during childbirth. UNMEER/Flickr

Zika and Ebola had a much worse effect on women: we need more research to address this in future

We found that less than 1% of published research papers around the time of both outbreaks, that related to the outbreaks, actually explored their gendered impact.
A vial of the Zika Virus Investigational DNA Vaccine from the NIH. NIH Image Gallery/Flickr

Why a Zika vaccine is a long way off

The long vaccine development process is focused on ensuring production of the safest and most effective vaccine for use.
The outbreak of Zika virus in Brazil had Australian travellers on alert but transmission is only possible in tropical Queensland. Cameron Webb

Common Australian mosquitoes can’t spread Zika

New research shows common local mosquitoes aren’t able to spread Zika. This means Australia is unlikely to see a major outbreak of the disease. But a risk remains in northern Queensland.
County officials gear up to hand-spray mosquitoes in San Diego. REUTERS/Earnie Grafton

How Congress is failing on Zika

Congress has failed three times to approve spending to stop the spread of Zika. Their long-term response isn't much better.
Most cases of Zika are asymptomatic. Airman Magazine/U.S. Air Force Photo/Tech. Sgt. Brandon Shapiro/Flickr

Zika virus: Only a few small outbreaks likely to occur in the continental US

A computer model suggests that while more cases of Zika can be expected in the continental U.S. outbreaks will probably be small and are not projected to spread.
A woman looks at a CDC health advisory sign about Zika at Miami International Airport Carlo Allegri/Reuters

US response to Zika: Fragmented and uneven

Politics, not epidemiology or medicine, drives government responses to disease. Politicians are the ultimate decision-makers in public health, and they must respond to political forces.

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