Science + Technology – Analysis and Comment

A team effort: Dr David Reitze, of the LIGO Laboratory at Caltech, shows the merging of two black holes that led to the detection of gravitational waves. REUTERS/Gary Cameron

Australia’s part in the global effort to discover gravitational waves

The discovery of gravitational waves involved a team of more than 1,000 scientists from across the globe, including Australia. So how does such an international collaboration work?
Wes Mountain/The Conversation

Timeline: the history of gravity

It's taken centuries for our understanding of gravity to evolve to where it is today, culminating in the discovery of gravitational waves, as predicted by Albert Einstein a century ago.
Massive bodies can send ripples through space time in the form of gravitational waves. NASA

Gravitational waves discovered: top scientists respond

The long awaited discovery of gravitational waves has sent ripples through the scientific world. Here top experts respond to the historic announcement.
When two black holes collide, the resulting gravitational ripples can be felt across the cosmos. Henze, NASA

Gravitational waves discovered: the universe has spoken

The detection of gravitational waves is the final confirmation of Einstein's theory of general relativity, and opens up a new window into the cosmos.
Even something as simple as a water pump might not work if it requires parts or power not readily available where it’s installed. World Bank

Where aid fails, appropriate technology can succeed

Much international aid fails to achieve its ends because the technology employed is not "appropriate" to its intended environment or culture. This needs to change.
Artist’s impression: Looking back 12.9-billion km towards the sun and the inner solar system from Sedna, one of the recently discovered minor planets in the Kuiper belt. NASA, ESA and Adolf Schaller

The long hunt for new objects in our expanding solar system

The search for new objects, including new planets, in our solar system has turned up some interesting finds. There have been a few failures over the years too.
Near threatened: The Tasmanian Bettong (Bettongia gaimardi) is now part of a plan to save the species and restore a wider conservation area at Mulligans Flat. Wikimedia/JJ Harrison

Extinction means more than a loss of species to Australia’s delicate ecosystems

Most wildlife plays a key role in any ecosystem. So when one becomes extinct, it can impact their habitat. And we're now finding we may have lost more species in Australia than first thought.
The vast expanse of Western Australia is perfect for radio astronomy. Pete Wheeler, ICRAR

Tuning in to cosmic radio from the dawn of time

The Murchison Widefield Array sits in remote Western Australia far from noisy civilisation so it can help us understand the universe by tuning into radio waves from the distant cosmos.
The Earth as seen from space – looks curved from up there. Flickr/NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

Why would anyone believe the Earth is flat?

It might seem crazy to believe the world is flat. But for some people it reinforces a narrative that gives their lives meaning.