Science + Technology – Research and News

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The flightless, nocturnal and sweet-smelling kākāpō was thought to be extinct, but during the 1970s, two remnant populations were discovered. One, in Fiordland, included only males. From Wikimedia Commons

Plant hormone boost for New Zealand’s critically endangered night parrot

New research suggests that New Zealand's bizarre nocturnal parrot, the kākāpō, needs plant hormones to breed successfully.
The drilling project at New Zealand’s Alpine Fault is the first to investigate a major fault that is due to rupture in a big earthquake in coming decades. John Townend/Victoria University of Wellington

New Zealand’s Alpine Fault reveals extreme underground heat and fluid pressure

An international team discovers extreme underground conditions at New Zealand's Alpine Fault, which is due to rupture in a major earthquake in the next few decades.
Melissa Little (right) and Minoru Takasato (centre) from the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute won the 2016 UNSW Eureka Prize for Scientific Research for work on growing kidney tissue from stem cells. MCRI

The 2016 Eureka Prizes showcase the best in Australian science

The pioneers of Australian scientific research, education and communication have been recognised in the 2016 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes.
Microbes living on corals are instrumental in keeping coral reefs healthy. Reuters/David Gray

Healthy microbes make for a resilient Great Barrier Reef

A new study provides insight into coral-dwelling microbial communities and how they react to pollution, overfishing, and climate change. What does it mean for the Great Barrier Reef?
Jason Clare says the government’s ‘second-rate copper NBN’ will not meet the needs of Australians in the future. Tracey Nearmy/AAP

Labor would upgrade NBN to fibre to the premises

Under the Labor NBN plan up to two million extra homes will get fibre-to-the-premise without additional cost to the government.
Latent fingermarks dusted with micronised Egyptian blue on a $20 note, viewed in the Near Infrared. Simon Lewis

Ancient Egyptian pigment provides modern forensics with new coat of paint

The ancient Egyptians knew a thing or two about how to produce a vibrant blue pigment for their tombs and coffins. Now it's being used to help find fingerprints.
A study has shown that turtle hatchlings lend each other a flipper digging out of the sand to save energy. Banco de Imagem Projeto Tamar/Flickr

Turtle hatchlings lend each other a flipper to save energy

New research suggests turtle hatchlings work together with clutch mates to escape their underground nests.
A butterfly’s wing viewed through an optical microscope (left) and the scanning helium microscope (right). University of Newcastle

New helium microscope reveals startling details without frying the sample

A new scanning helium microscope offers the potential for capturing images with finer resolution than optical microscopes, but without damaging samples as with electron microscopes.
Malcolm Turnbull says businesses and governments must better educate and empower employees to use sound practices online. Mick Tsikas/AAP

Turnbull warns of growing cyber aggression

Australian public and private sector organisations and individuals are facing malicious cyber activity that is unprecedented in scale and reach, Malcolm Turnbull warns.
This attractive specimen, collected from a doorknob in New York, loved being in space. Alex Alexiev/UC Davis

Bacteria found to thrive better in space than on Earth

One common terrestrial bacterium has been found to grow in the microgravity of the International Space Station than on Earth, although it remains a mystery why.