Science + Technology – Research and News

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Melissa Little (right) and Minoru Takasato (centre) from the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute won the 2016 UNSW Eureka Prize for Scientific Research for work on growing kidney tissue from stem cells. MCRI

The 2016 Eureka Prizes showcase the best in Australian science

The pioneers of Australian scientific research, education and communication have been recognised in the 2016 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes.
Microbes living on corals are instrumental in keeping coral reefs healthy. Reuters/David Gray

Healthy microbes make for a resilient Great Barrier Reef

A new study provides insight into coral-dwelling microbial communities and how they react to pollution, overfishing, and climate change. What does it mean for the Great Barrier Reef?
Jason Clare says the government’s ‘second-rate copper NBN’ will not meet the needs of Australians in the future. Tracey Nearmy/AAP

Labor would upgrade NBN to fibre to the premises

Under the Labor NBN plan up to two million extra homes will get fibre-to-the-premise without additional cost to the government.
Latent fingermarks dusted with micronised Egyptian blue on a $20 note, viewed in the Near Infrared. Simon Lewis

Ancient Egyptian pigment provides modern forensics with new coat of paint

The ancient Egyptians knew a thing or two about how to produce a vibrant blue pigment for their tombs and coffins. Now it's being used to help find fingerprints.
A study has shown that turtle hatchlings lend each other a flipper digging out of the sand to save energy. Banco de Imagem Projeto Tamar/Flickr

Turtle hatchlings lend each other a flipper to save energy

New research suggests turtle hatchlings work together with clutch mates to escape their underground nests.
A butterfly’s wing viewed through an optical microscope (left) and the scanning helium microscope (right). University of Newcastle

New helium microscope reveals startling details without frying the sample

A new scanning helium microscope offers the potential for capturing images with finer resolution than optical microscopes, but without damaging samples as with electron microscopes.
Malcolm Turnbull says businesses and governments must better educate and empower employees to use sound practices online. Mick Tsikas/AAP

Turnbull warns of growing cyber aggression

Australian public and private sector organisations and individuals are facing malicious cyber activity that is unprecedented in scale and reach, Malcolm Turnbull warns.
This attractive specimen, collected from a doorknob in New York, loved being in space. Alex Alexiev/UC Davis

Bacteria found to thrive better in space than on Earth

One common terrestrial bacterium has been found to grow in the microgravity of the International Space Station than on Earth, although it remains a mystery why.
Alan Finkel participates in a debate with Nobel Laureate, Brian Schmidt. AAP Image/Alan Porritt

Alan Finkel to be Australia’s new Chief Scientist

Australia's new Chief Scientist, Dr Alan Finkel, is a passionate advocate for science and technology, and has argued that Australia should consider nuclear power.
Image of a mini-kidney formed in a dish from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Minoru Takasato

Kidney failing? Grow a new one

The ability to grow new kidneys from stem cells might transform our treatment for kidney disease.
The 1000 Genome Project is comparing the genomes of thousands of people from around the world. Shutterstock

Thousands of genomes reveal human genetic differences around the world

The 1000 Genome Project has revealed the genetic variations that exist among people around the world, and discovered that some people are missing many genes.
The hormone irisin is one of the things that makes exercise good for us. will ockenden/Flickr

The verdict is in: feel-good exercise hormone irisin is real

Scientists in the US have found that a feel-good exercise hormone called irisin does indeed exist in humans, putting to bed long-disputed claims that it is a myth.