Articles on 2015 Intergenerational Report

Displaying 1 - 20 of 22 articles

Malcolm Turnbull outlines his vision of ‘City Deals’ that enable ‘smart cities’ to drive growth in the new economy. AAP/Lukas Coch

Will Budget 2016 deliver a new deal for Australian cities?

The Turnbull government sees the 'City Deal' as a way for 'smart cities' to drive innovation and growth. But what is the value proposition behind this UK concept and how might it work in Australia?
Despite the Intergenerational Report’s assertion about ageing’s negative impact on labour force participation, the effect turns out to be minimal. Image sourced from www.shutterstock.com

Truthy untruths: behind the facade of the Intergenerational Report

The 2015 Intergenerational Report is being used as a basis for important decisions about future policies. But it makes some misleading claims.
Dr Karl shouldn’t be afraid of getting political - as long as he’s doing it for science, not politicians. AAP Image/Mick Tsikas

Dr Karl didn’t breach ethics, but now he should spruik the science

Dr Karl has been criticised for fronting adverts for a government report he turned out not to agree with. But despite his lapse in judgement, he hasn't seriously breached his journalistic ethics.
Housing security matters for older Australians like the residents of Millers Point, Sydney, who fear having to make way for development. AAP/Hugh Peterswald

Suitable, affordable housing is key to our population ageing well

Without affordable and secure housing that meets the needs of older Australians, the nation cannot hope to sustain the productivity that is needed to secure future prosperity.
Culture hardly rates a mention in the current Intergenerational Report, or those that preceded it. Mark Roy

Speaking of future generations … let’s not forget culture

Culture is barely mentioned in the latest Intergenerational Report – as was the case with the three preceding it. But we need strong policies to support cultural heritage, and we need them urgently.
Traffic congestion in the major cities is expected to cost Australians A$20.4 billion a year by 2020. Image sourced from Shutterstock.com

The tenuous link between population and prosperity

Linking population growth with productivity and labour participation is problematic, just one of many questionable assumptions made in the Intergenerational Report.
Australia’s projected population for 2050 in the fourth Intergenerational Report is 1.9 million larger than the 35.9 million projected by the third report. AAP/Joe Castro

Population growth could go far beyond IGR projections

How appropriate were the fourth Intergenerational Report's demographic assumptions? Should greater attention be paid to the potential consequences of population growth?
The Pre-election Fiscal and Economic Outlook is prepared by the Treasurer’s advisers, but the Intergenerational Report is the Treasurer’s document. Lukas Coch/AAP

Time to rethink the Charter of Budget Honesty

Forecasts released under the Charter of Budget Honesty are on the wrong time horizon and need greater transparency.
Australia is experiencing a baby ‘boom’, with 13% more babies born between 2003 and 2012 than in the previous decade. Flickr/Lon Martin

The IGR focuses on the old, when the future belongs to the young

Releasing Australia’s fourth Intergenerational Report, Joe Hockey described it as the “social compact between generations”, which would help “identify where the future opportunities will be” and “unlock…
Treasurer Joe Hockey didn’t mention climate change in his speech on Australia’s prospects for 2055. AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Climate is an intergenerational issue, but the report ducked it

Climate change barely rates a mention in the Intergenerational Report, despite the huge potential costs. Peter Christoff says the only way to overcome this short-sightedness is to end the politics and make the review independent.

Top contributors

More