Displaying 1 - 20 of 321 articles

Locust sits on a wheat stalk. Eduard Korniyenko/Reuters

Pesticides are not the only way to deal with our biggest food competitor: insects

Insects have been in a feature in agriculture since the end of the 19th century. Using a combination of new and old control methods is the best way to deal with our food competitors.
The Sahel, the transition zone between the arid north of Africa and tropic south, has highly variable rainfall. Center for International Forestry Research.

Native shrubs: a simple fix for drought-stricken crops in Sub-Saharan Africa

Field trials in Senegal show native shrubs can access deep-soil water and make it available to adjacent crops – a technique that could alleviate drought conditions in marginal lands around the world.
The Murray-Darling: a complex river system with a complex set of regulations to match. AAP Image/Caroline Duncan Photography

Giving water policy to the Nationals could trigger a logjam of bureaucracy

Water isn't straightforward. And by putting the Nationals in charge of policy for water assets like the Murray-Darling Basin, the government will trigger a complex round of bureaucratic musical chairs.
An Ethiopian girl sells barley seeds in northern Tigray. The sub-Saharan Africa seed industry remains largely informal. REUTERS/Radu Sigheti

Local start-ups hold the key to transforming Africa’s seed industry

The seed industry in sub-Saharan Africa suffers from many challenges. India, which has one of the biggest seed markets in the world, offers some lessons on how these challenges could be overcome.
Africa needs to support small and medium-sized enterprises across the value chain of the agribusiness sector. Reuters/Noor Khamis

What Africa can learn from China about growing its agribusiness sector

Over the past 60 years, China has experimented extensively with policies and programmes to encourage the growth of rural enterprises. Africa could do well by following in these footsteps.
South African exports to the rest of the continent have more than doubled over the past 20 years. This has been driven by agricultural products, including maize. Shutterstock

Why Africa offers growing opportunities for agricultural products

The demand for agricultural products in Africa is expected to rise over the next 35 years due to factors such as population growth, urbanisation, economic growth and changing diets.
A South African farmer from Piketberg 100km outside Cape Town inspects the dry soil in his field of sewn wheat. It is cheaper to import the crop than to grow it commercially. Epa/Nic Bothma

South Africa’s struggling agricultural sector: what went wrong 20 years ago

South Africa's agricultural industry has struggled over the past 20 years due to the country's rush to liberalise the sector while other countries continued to support their farmers.
The Liverpool Plains near Gunnedah in New South Wales where the Watermark coal mine would be built. Tim J Keegan/Flickr

Shenhua mine’s water uncertainty means we should proceed with caution

The controversial Shenhua Watermark coal mine in New South Wales recently cleared another hurdle along the way to being granted full approval to proceed. But there are major environmental risks which should still call the project into question.
Not all bees are honeybees. This is a green ‘sweat’ bee. Ian Jacobs/flickr

Losing bees will sting more than just our taste for honey

Data from all over the globe suggest that bees are in decline, and we may lose a lot more than honey if bees are unable to cope with the changing climate and increasing demand for agricultural land.

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