Articles on Crimes against humanity

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Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir during a rally against the ICC. Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Reuters

Withdrawal from the ICC: A sad day for South Africa and Africa

The South African government's decision to withdraw from the ICC should not be seen in isolation. The African Union has called on its member states to withdraw from the court.
In Egypt, the Great Pyramid was illuminated with the French, Russian and Lebanese flags in solidarity with victims of terrorist attacks, but most of the focus in the West has been on the victims in Paris. EPA/Khaled Elfiqi

Solidarity after Paris means being more attentive to suffering elsewhere

Selective sympathy raises troubling questions. If you neglect suffering in other places, it is much more difficult to mobilise political actors to take it seriously.
South Africa’s President Jacob Zuma being welcomed on his arrival in Khartoum by Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir earlier this year. Reuters/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Leaving the ICC won’t absolve South Africa of its legal obligations

South Africa's withdrawal from the ICC could have mere symbolic value. The country will continue to have obligations to binding decisions taken by the UN Security Council – including those pertaining to the court.
Former Chadian leader Hissène Habré reacts as he is escorted by Senegalese police into the Palais de Justice in Dakar, Senegal, on July 20. He is accused of crimes against humanity and mass murder. EPA

Chadian dictator’s tactics mimic script of former rulers facing criminal charges

Former Chadian President Hissène Habré's disruption of his trial, questioning its authority over him, is a tried and tested defence strategy used by revolutionaries and rulers for eons.
Does relentlessly criticising Australia’s human rights record risk doing more harm than good? Courntey Biggs/AAP

Is Australia as bad as IS? Skewed criticism may leave you wondering

Australia's human rights record isn't perfect, but it still good. if Australians aren't able to take some pride in that and be inspired to do even better, over-the-top criticism could backfire.
Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta at the International Criminal Court in The Hague yesterday. He has been accused of organising mass ethnic violence. EPA/PETER DE JONG

The International Criminal Court on trial as it takes on a President

The first appearance of a head of state at the International Criminal Court at The Hague yesterday was a landmark event. But instead of getting any closer to the truth about who was behind violence that…

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