Articles on Extinction

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What it could have looked like when humans and megafauna lived together: a giant macropod Procoptodon goliah in the foreground, while Thylacinus cynocephalus hunts for prey nearby. A herd of Zygomaturus can be see on the lake edge of the ancient Willandra system. Illustration by Laurie Beirne

Aboriginal Australians co-existed with the megafauna for at least 17,000 years

The extinction of the giant reptiles, marsupials and birds that once called Australia home has been the subject of much debate, including the role early Australians may have had on their fate.
Giraffes’ future is much less secure than many people had imagined. Craig Fraser/Shutterstock

It’s time to stand tall for imperilled giraffes

Are giraffes really facing extinction? The decline of these beloved animals - and many others – has been hidden in plain sight as Africa builds ever more roads, railways and cities.
The grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus): at 60 grams, nearly the smallest primate in the world. I studied this primate in Madagascar. Jason Gilchrist, www.jasongilchrist.co.uk

Dawn of ‘Trumpocene’ era spells disaster for world’s primates

As Donald Trump prepares to enter the White House, there may be dark days ahead for some of the world's rarest and most beautiful primates.
How many species of frog are in the picture? Genetics often says ‘more than we thought’. Michael Lee (Flinders University & South Australian Museum)

The Earth’s biodiversity could be much greater than we thought

The Earth is full of many varied species from the largest mammals to the tiniest organisms. But we now think there could be ten times more species than was originally thought.
Species lost from the eastern forests of the U.S. – from left to right: Ivory-billed Woodpecker, Passenger Pigeon, Carolina Parakeet and Bachman’s Warbler. Alexander C. Lees ©Cornell University Museum of Vertebrates

Will we soon see another wave of bird extinctions in the Americas?

The extinction threat you haven't heard of: several South American birds teeter on the brink of existence due to habitat loss. And history is not the best guide for how to save them.

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