Articles on Floods

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Cairns has lots of hard grey infrastructure but much less green infrastructure that would reduce the impacts of the city’s growth. Karine Dupré

Cities can grow without wrecking reefs and oceans. Here’s how

Urbanisation is the main reason for rising temperatures and water pollution, but receives little attention in discussions about the health of water streams, reefs and oceans.
Flooding in Sydney last week was the latest example of Australian cities’ lack of resilience to a more extreme climate. Dean Lewins/AAP

Design for flooding: how cities can make room for water

Australia's coastal settlements are highly exposed to the impacts of climate change. Climate-resilient urban landscapes that can cope with large amounts of water need to become the new normal.
Households in rural and regional areas are more likely to be insured than those in cities, possibly because rural residents are more attuned to environmental conditions and the risks to property. Tasmania Police/AAP

Insurance is unaffordable for some, but it’s middle Australia that is underinsured

The differences between owners and the growing number of renters, and between rural and urban areas, point to explanations other than affordability for the one-in-two Australians who are underinsured.
Wetlands can have decades-long dry periods. Felicity Burke/The Conversation

Why a wetland might not be wet

Wetlands in Australia are often dry. They may look unassuming but it's a vital part of their vibrant lifecycle.
South-East Queensland residents need to prepare for more regular floods, according to new data. Shutterstock

South-East Queensland is droughtier and floodier than we thought

We rely on climate data to help us make important decisions for our future, such as building infrastructure. But what if a region's climate has long been more volatile than we realised?
A storm caused flooding in the CBD as it swept through Hobart. Patrick Gee/The Mercury. Used with permission

Lessons in resilience: what city planners can learn from Hobart’s floods

Managing flood risk is not just 'good planning'; it requires commitment to resilient cities by land developers, politicians and communities. Effective response means learning from mistakes.
The male cardinal tenderly feeding his mate is just one example of the hard work wild animals undertake in springtime. That work often benefits humans. (Shutterstock)

How the hard work of wild animals benefits us too

Wild animals are hard at work this spring. Here's how their hard labour benefits humans, and why we should be more appreciative.
Places such as Berri were affected by Millennium Drought, caused by low cool-season rain. New materials and techniques are now being used to observe drought causes and water patterns in Australia’s history to help the future. Gary Sauer-Thompson/flickr

Recent Australian droughts may be the worst in 800 years

Australia has always suffered heat and flood, but a detailed seasonal rainfall reconstruction of the last 800 years shows the extremes are intensifying.
Floods in South East Queensland follow a 40-year cycle, and planners should take note. AAP Image

Floods don’t occur randomly, so why do we still plan as if they do?

Engineering practice assumes that floods are randomly distributed but science suggests they are not. This raises questions about the reliability of flood infrastructure and management strategies.

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