Articles on Grattan Institute

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Another election, another infrastructure promise – in the Andrews government’s case, a $50 billion suburban rail loop. Penny Stephens/AAP

Infrastructure splurge ignores smarter ways to keep growing cities moving

In the election bidding wars, parties commit billions to transport projects, often before all the work needed to justify these has been done. More cost-effective alternatives hardly get a look-in.
The beauty of our federation is that each state can learn from each other. Shutterstock

Grattan Institute Orange Book 2018. State governments matter, vote wisely

Ahead of two state elections, the Grattan Institute Orange Book examines the state of each state and how each can do things better. The good news is that if each copied the best in each field they would do very well indeed.
Transparency isn’t a silver bullet, but increasing it would go some way to changing the secrecy around who has access – and how much – to the government of the day. AAP/Lukas Coch

Influence in Australian politics needs an urgent overhaul – here’s how to do it

A new report from Grattan Institute argues the secrecy and inequality surrounding who has "say" and "sway" in Canberra can be remedied – if politicians can just find the will to do it.
One reason universities might not achieve good student outcomes is that they do not spend enough money on teaching. Shutterstock

Performance funding is not the way to improve university teaching

Universities now have the incentive and flexibility to respond to student interests, and we shouldn't distract them with policy changes that could make things worse.
A tax on sugary drinks wouldn’t just prevent obesity, it could recoup some of the costs from obesity to the taxpayer. from www.shutterstock.com.au

A sugary drinks tax could recoup some of the costs of obesity while preventing it

Obesity imposes enormous costs on the community, through higher taxes to fund extra government spending on health and from foregone tax revenue because obese people are more likely to be unemployed.

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