Articles on Gravitational waves

Displaying 1 - 20 of 48 articles

A simulation of the latest binary black hole merger detected by LIGO. Blue indicates weak fields and yellow indicates strong fields. Numerical-relativistic Simulation: S Ossokine, A Buonanno (Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics) and the Simulating eXtreme Spacetime project Scientific Visualization: T Dietrich (Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics), R Haas (NCSA)

A new discovery of gravitational waves has black holes in a spin

Scientists have made a third detection of gravitational waves, again caused by the merger of two black holes. But they think there's something different about the black holes in this case.
The discovery of the year was the first detection of gravitational waves. LIGO/T. Pyle

2016: the year in space and astronomy

Colliding black holes to exploding spacecraft, 2016 was an incredible year for astrophysics.
Hi Juno, welcome to Jupiter. NASA/JPL

2016, the year that was: Science + Technology

From the discovery of gravitational waves, to the Pokémon Go phenomenon to the Census debacle, it's been a big year in science and technology.
An illustration showing the merger of two black holes and the gravitational waves that ripple outward. LIGO/T. Pyle

Second detection heralds the era of gravitational wave astronomy

The observation of gravitational waves from a second black hole merger implies there are many more black holes in the universe than scientists had previously anticipated.
Making waves. Flickr/Max Nathan

Explainer: making waves in science

We find them at the beach, in every sound and light show, the miracle of wi-fi and now in the fabric of space-time itself. But what exactly is a wave?
Einstein claimed that, had he not pursued science, he would have been a musician. Robert and Talbot Trudeau

Good vibrations: the role of music in Einstein’s thinking

Einstein, an accomplished violinist, claimed that, had he not pursued science, he would have been a musician. That's worth reflecting on, in the wake of last week's discovery of gravitational waves.
Music has always played a part in investigating the universe. Sonic visualisation of 'The Storm' by Peter Drach.

Gravitational waves add a new note to our musical universe

Music has always played a role in our understanding of the universe. Listening to gravitational waves confirms thousands of years of metaphysical investigation.

Top contributors

More