Articles on heat stress

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Some materials and surfaces radiate much more heat (red areas) than others, as can be seen in this thermal image of Arncliffe Street in Wolli Creek, Sydney.

Building cool cities for a hot future

Hot spots occur at the scale of where people live – the building, the street, the block – which means urban design and building materials have profound implications for our health and well-being.
For every death there’ll be many more hospital admissions for things such as strokes and heart attacks. Vladimirs Koskins/Shutterstock

Cold weather is a bigger killer than extreme heat – here’s why

Most people are acutely aware of the toll the heat can take on human life. So it may come as a surprise that more Australians die from the cold than the heat.
Heated contest: Mitchell Johnson and Steve Smith try to cool down during the Brisbane test in December 2014. AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Just not cricket – how climate change will make sport more risky

Sport is fundamental to Australia’s society, culture and economy. But how would we cope when the rising heat threatens some of our most beloved pastimes? A new report from the Climate Institute urges sports…
Queensland’s drought conditions have been worsened by persistent high temperatures. AAP Image/Dan Peled

Who’s been affected by Australia’s extreme heat? Everyone

Australia has been hit by two years of heat: 2013 was the hottest ever recorded and 2014 wasn’t far behind, taking third place. The country has also sweltered through several significant heatwaves, and…
Wind and humidity affect how easy it is to cool off in a heatwave. Big swimming pools help, too. AAP Image/Dan Peled

Bad luck, Brisbane: muggy cities will feel future heat even more

Several Australian cities, such as Adelaide and Perth, have greeted 2015 with scorching weather as summer hits its stride – the kind of conditions that leave us crying out for an air conditioner, rather…
Tennis fans cool off at the Australian Open in Melbourne this week. AAP Image/Joe Castro

How heat can make your body melt down from the inside out

Just as Ray Bradbury’s novel Fahrenheit 451 identified a temperature at which paper self-combusts, the Australian Open has just shown the world that there is a temperature at which tennis players start…

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