Articles on Indigenous

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Maps can be a tool in the defense of Indigenous communities against extractive industries. Canadian Centre for Architecture; Grant Tigner, painter. Seagrams Limited, publisher. The St. Lawrence Seaway and Power Project, in The St. Lawrence Seaway: The Realization of a Mighty Dream, 1954.

Using maps as a weapon to resist extractive industries on Indigenous territories

Historically, western corporate maps have been privileged over Indigenous ones. But given the essential debate of territory in resource conflicts, maps are a crucial tool.
Homeless camps like this one in downtown Nanaimo, B.C., photographed in 2018 can be seen all over North America. THE CANADIAN PRESS Jonathan Hayward

The aging face of homelessness in North American cities

The number of seniors experiencing homelessness in Vancouver has increased in recent years, according to the city’s Homeless Count.
An aerial view of the Kapyong Barracks in an affluent area of Winnipeg, site of one of the most recent urban First Nations reserves. It will soon be transferred to seven Treaty One First Nations. (Facebook)

Urban reserves are tests of reconciliation

Kapyong Barracks in Winnipeg is set to be transferred to Treaty One First Nations to become an urban reserve. A 64-hectare parcel in an affluent area, the reserve will be a test of reconciliation.
We’ve underestimated the extent of mixing between ancestral groups throughout human history. from www.shutterstock.com

How DNA ancestry testing can change our ideas of who we are

Estimating our ancestry is hard – because our backgrounds are much more mixed up than we thought. So don't take your DNA ancestry test results literally: they're just a prediction.
Senator Yvonne Boyer, a Metis lawyer and former nurse called tubal ligations carried out on unwilling Indigenous women one of the “most heinous” practices in health care happening across Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Forced sterilizations of Indigenous women: One more act of genocide

It may not be legally called genocide, but the impact of the Canadian government's actions, including the sterilization of Indigenous women, still add up to genocidal practices.
The remote community of Urapunga in South East Arnhem Land, more at the mercy of the finance industry than most. J. Louth

Banking Royal Commission: How Hayne failed remote Australia

It's far away from the cities and towns where banks and finance companies are really predatory, but it's not where Hayne looked.
In this October 1998 photo, Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu dance after Tutu handed over the final report of South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Pretoria. (AP Photo/Zoe Selsky)

Do truth and reconciliation commissions heal divided nations?

Wherever there is an ugly, unresolved injustice pulling at the fabric of a society, there is an opportunity to haul it out in public and deal with it through a truth commission.
Supporters of the Unist'ot'en camp and Wet'suwet'en walk along a bridge over the Wedzin kwa River leading towards the main camp outside Houston, B.C., on Jan. 9, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Unist’ot’en and the limits of reconciliation in Canada

It's time to engage with Indigenous people through the governance systems built prior to European settlement.
Indigenous women’s activism in Canada has a long history. The organizing work of Isabelle McNab, first president of the Saskatchewan Women’s Indian Association, can be seen as the precursor to later activism like this First Nations Idle No More protest for better treatment of Indigenous peoples at the Douglas-Peace Arch near Surrey, B.C., on Jan. 5, 2013. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Hidden from history: Indigenous women’s activism in Saskatchewan

Built on historical research, this article tells the resilient, fascinating and rarely told history of Indigenous women's organizing and resistance in Saskatchewan.
Indigenous Australians must be involved in research around provenance and country. Here, representatives of the Willandra Aboriginal Elders visit the Griffith University ancient DNA laboratory. Renee Chapman

DNA from ancient Aboriginal Australian remains enables their return to Country

Museums around the world hold remains of Aboriginal people that were often taken without permission and in the absence of accurate records. New DNA methods may help return these items to country.
A family of Ahiarmiut, including David Serkoak pictured behind his mother Mary Qahug Miki (centre) at Ennadai Lake in the mid-50s before the Canadian government forcefully relocation them.

Canada’s genocide: The case of the Ahiarmiut

Once we understand genocide as something that can take awhile, with victims dying of starvation and disease rather than outright murder, we can recognize the genocide of Indigenous peoples in Canada.
Indigenous youth planning on attending post-secondary education would benefit from appropriate financial literacy information. Here students Cheyenne Wilson, 13, Roy Joseph, 13, centre, and Connor Roberts, 13, after attending a presentation by B.C.‘s representative for Children and Youth at Shoreline Community School in Victoria, B.C., on May 15, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Financial empowerment is the road to success for Indigenous youth

Indigenous entrepreneurship is growing at a rate six times faster than the general Canadian population and it is 10 years younger. Culturally relevant financial literacy is critical to its success.
Prince Harry and his wife, Meghan, receive a “hongi,” a traditional Māori welcome, from Māori elders on the lawns of Government House in Wellington, New Zealand in October 2018. In New Zealand, Māori elect members to parliament from designated Māori constituencies – and the right to participate offers more than the ‘duty to consult’ in Canada. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Lessons from New Zealand on the ‘duty to consult’ First Nations

In New Zealand, sovereignty is disputed, but the Maori case for sharing it with settlers underscores the limits of First Nations consultation in Canada.
The most commonly criticised feature of the bill is the arbitrary maximum period of two years within which a decision about permanent placement has to be made. Shutterstock

Why controversial child protection reforms in NSW could lead to another Stolen Generation

One of the state's most significant powers is the ability to remove children from their families. Potential reforms in NSW could expand this already racialised power in frightening ways.
Chief Archie Waquan responds to the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision on whether the government has a duty to consult Indigenous people on legislation. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Amber Bracken

Let Indigenous treaties – not the duty to consult – lead us to reconciliation

Rather than the duty to consult, governments should proactively engage with Indigenous treaties or other locally relevant treaties, agreements, laws and relationships at all stages of law-making.
A young Indigenous boy waits to dance after the Walk for Reconciliation in Vancouver in September 2017. The election of the Justin Trudeau government in 2015 seems to have fuelled a shift in how Indigenous people are described in the media. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

From ‘Aboriginal’ to ‘Indigenous’ in the Justin Trudeau era

The election of Justin Trudeau in 2015 has coincided with a shift in language in the media -- the term 'Aboriginal' has been increasingly replaced by the term 'Indigenous.' Here's why.
Steve Courtoreille, chief of the Mikisew Cree First Nation, is seen on Parliament Hill in January 2013 after speaking about legal action against the federal government. The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled against the First Nation. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

What the Supreme Court ruling means for Indigenous consultation

The headlines suggest the Supreme Court of Canada has ruled against Indigenous consultation. But its recent ruling is much more nuanced and complex than that.

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