Articles on Indigenous

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Designs by Jeneen Frei Njootli on the runway at the Frost Moon Showcase at Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto last weekend. (Red Works Photography)

Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto is healing and resurgence in action

The organizers of Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto gathered a group of designers and creative thinkers to present and discuss the future of Indigenous fashion last week.
With the legalization of cannabis in Canada just around the corner, there’s still too much panic over drug education. There’s no need to rush awareness campaigns in advance of legalization; it’s better to start doing them right. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Why we need better, smarter, panic-free education on cannabis

When it comes to cannabis legalization, we don’t need more education, we need to do education better.
A Simon Fraser University student wears a First Nations Coast Salish woven cedar hat as she and other students wait to receive their degrees during the fall convocation ceremony at the university in Burnaby, B.C., on October 11, 2013. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Why there are so few Indigenous graduates at convocation

Wilful under-funding of Indigenous education is producing an Indigenous underclass.
‘The Block’ in Redfern has been a site of struggle and activism for Indigenous inclusion in planning processes. AAP Image/Paul Miller

Indigenous communities are reworking urban planning, but planners need to accept their history

While planning policies and practices have contributed to marginalising Indigenous people, planners can now work with them to ensure they have their rightful say in shaping Australian communities.
A Palestinian boy burns tires during Land Day protests in the West Bank city of Ramallah on March 30, 2018. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

Palestinian Land Day: A universal reminder of what was stolen

Like the colonization of Indigenous lands in North America and the squeezing of Indigenous peoples into "reserves," the colonization and appropriation of Palestinian land is unrelenting.
Tabletop games have been around for more than a century. Early North American game makers often depicted Indigenous people as savage enemies.

The hidden history of Indigenous stereotypes in tabletop games

For more than a century, board games have provided children with some of their first exposure to Indigenous stereotypes — hidden behind ornate lithographs, painted cubes and punched cardboard.
Barney Williams Jr., a residential school survivor, hugs Santa Ono, president of the University of British Columbia, during the opening of the Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre at Vancouver, on April 9. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ben Nelms

A university president apologizes for academia’s role in residential schools

The role of universities in the shameful Indian residential school system needs to be addressed. The president of one of Canada's leading universities explains why it's time to apologize.
Debbie Baptiste, the mother of Colten Boushie, enters the Court of Queen’s Bench as the jury is in deliberation in the trial of Gerald Stanley, the farmer accused of killing her 22-year-old son, in Battleford, Sask., Friday, February 9, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Liam Richards)

How racial bias likely impacted the Stanley verdict

Racial bias likely played a role in the Gerald Stanley case. This article explains how racial dynamics and process failures enabled systemic racism to play a part in Stanley’s acquittal.
Tiana Schocko, from Peshawbestown, Mich., and of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa tribe, competes in the youth division of the 22nd Annual World Championship Hoop Dance Contest Sunday, Feb. 12, 2012, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Federal budget undermines Indigenous self-determination in sport programs

The federal government's 2018 budget allocates almost $50 million over five years to support sports programs for Indigenous peoples. The problem? The money is going to a non-Indigenous organization.
Gerald Stanley enters the courthouse in Battleford, Sask., in February 2018 during his trial in the death of Colten Boushie, an Indigenous man. The use by Stanley’s defence team of peremptory challenges produced an all-white jury in his trial. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Liam Richards

A good first step towards diverse, impartial Canadian juries

The Canadian government's criminal justice bill would abolish what are known as peremptory challenges. Here's why that's long overdue.
Debbie Baptiste, mother of Colten Boushie, is seen here in the House of Commons in February 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

I am a Mi’kmaq lawyer, and I despair over Colten Boushie

Indigenous people are seriously questioning whether Canada is truly changing following the acquittal of the man accused of killing Colten Boushie. A Mi'kmaq lawyer explains the despair.
Colten Boushie’s uncle Alvin Baptiste raises an eagle’s wing as demonstrators gather outside of the courthouse in North Battleford, Sask., on Saturday, Feb. 10, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Matt Smith

The myth of the Wheat King and the killing of Colten Boushie

In the acquittal of Gerald Stanley we must remember how one-sided systematic remembering in Canada has been. We must remember how Canadian-state law created the myth of the homesteader as Wheat King.
Health impacts from anti-Black racism and anti-Indigeneity are often dismissed or kept silent by health scholars and health care workers. Shutterstock

Racism impacts your health

A health and human rights researcher, therapist and professor explains why racial justice is a public health issue.

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