Articles on Indigenous Peoples

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Success will come from changing the way Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s issues are talked about and addressed – from one of deficit in which people are described as problematic to one of empowerment and strength. Global Panorama/Flickr

Indigenous reconciliation in Australia: still a bridge too far?

In many ways, the "great Australian silence" about Indigenous history, pointed out by eminent anthropologist W.E.H. Stanner back in 1968, still endures in this country some 50 years later.
Native Americans have struggled for recognition of the violence done to them through colonisation and the persistent harms of settler colonialism. EPA/Mike Nelson

Indigenous reconciliation in the US shows how sovereignty and constitutional recognition work together

Despite significant shortcomings in the negotiation, content and honouring of treaties, they continue to define the nature of the relationship between most Native Americans and the United States.
Despite the Treaty of Waitangi, acts by both the British Crown and successive New Zealand governments have had detrimental effects on the Māori population. AAP Image/SNPA Pool, David Rowland

New Zealand’s indigenous reconciliation efforts show having a treaty isn’t enough

Reconciliation efforts were established in New Zealand 30 years ago to tackle grievances stemming from government initiatives that have seen Māori lose both resources and power.
Apologies for past injustices issued to indigenous people in Canada, Australia, the United States and New Zealand in the last few decades are signs of progress. butupa/Flickr

Indigenous reconciliation is hard, it re-opens wounds to heal them

Australia's national legitimacy is compromised by the failure to repair its relationship with its Indigenous population. Our series explores different ways of resolving this unfinished business.
On the hunt for other cultures. Shutterstock/Gorosi

What does an anthropologist actually do?

Ask any anthropologist what they do and they will find it hard to give you a direct answer. But it ultimately comes down to studying people and their culture.

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