Articles on Indonesia

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In the medical culture of the Bugis and Makassar peoples in Indonesia the word koroq means that the penis is actually shrinking, or retracting, but the Dutch in the 19th-century East Indies did not believe it was real. shutterstock

Is shrinking penis syndrome a delusion or a real thing?

Koro is widely believed to be a culturally localised delusion. But a theory that it's a fight-or-flight reflex might be corroborated by studying traditional healing treatments in Indonesia.
More than 250,000 people took to the streets in a 2016 protest organised by hardline Muslim groups against Jakarta’s Christian mayor. Lauren Farrow/AAP

Is Indonesia retreating from democracy?

Indonesia has long been held up as a model of democratic transition in the Muslim world. This view of the country now needs rethinking.
Cocos Malay photo from the 1910s showing a wedding procession that is still practised today with the groom pictured going to the bride’s house accompanied by members of the community. Wikimedia Commons/From the book 'Coral reefs and islands' authored by Jones, F. Wood (Frederic Wood), 1879-1954, Published by Lovell Reeve & Co. , Ltd. London. Photo digitized by Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

A group of Southeast Asian descendants wants to be recognised as Indigenous Australians

In the 1800s, a group of Southeast Asians were taken to the Cocos (Keeling) Islands, now part of Australia, by an English merchant. Their descendants are seeking Indigenous status from Australia.
The death threat looms large over Indonesian youth as their rate of smoking is high. www.shutterstock.com

Protecting young Indonesian hearts from tobacco

Indonesia has the region's highest rate of smoking among youths – one in five between the ages of 13 and 15 smoke. What should the government should do to stop youth from smoking?
Anti-terror police guard the house of the family that detonated bombs in Surabaya, Indonesia, May 15 2018. Fully Handoko/EPA

How people become suicide bombers: the six steps to terrorism

To prevent people from climbing the staircase to terrorism, educating people about the values of tolerance should start early.
A protester walks near burning police cars during a clash with police at a protest against allegedly blasphemous remarks by Jakarta’s then governor, Basuki “Ahok” Tjahaja Purnama, outside the presidential palace in Jakarta in November 2016. Mast Irham/EPA

Behind the rise of blasphemy cases in Indonesia

The reasons for the rise in the number of blasphemy cases in Indonesia since the reform era are more than just religious ones.

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