Articles on Irrigation

Displaying 1 - 20 of 34 articles

An Egyptian farmer tries to irrigate his land with water from a well. Reuters/Mohamed Abd El Ghany

A worsening water crisis in North Africa and the Middle East

At present, the Middle East and North African region contains 7% of the world's population but only has access to 1.5% of its renewable freshwater supply through rainfall.
Under the proposal, irrigators would have to submit a statement that tallies with aerial images of their water use. AAP Image/Cubbie Group

‘Tax returns for water’: satellite-audited statements can save the Murray-Darling

Allegations of water theft have thrown the Murray-Darling Basin Plan into crisis. The solution could involve users declaring their annual water use, subject to random audits - like a tax return.
Irrigation pumps along the Barwon River in New South Wales. AAP Image/Dean Lewins

Is the Murray-Darling Basin Plan broken?

The system that allocates water use in Australia's largest river basin relies on a shared commitment by states to uphold the rules. New allegations of water theft threaten to break that trust.
Children walk through a maize plantation in Zimbabwe, one of the countries in which irrigated areas might be double the officially-recognised area. Reuters/Philimon Bulawayo

Invisible irrigators: how small-scale Tanzanian farmers are making a difference

Official statistics in Tanzania do not capture small-scale irrigation, meaning that it's impact is unclear. Yet new research reveals that it's two to three times greater than previously thought
The Millennium drought had a huge impact on the Murray-Darling river system. suburbanbloke/Flickr/Wikimedia Commons

The lessons we need to learn to deal with the ‘creeping disaster’ of drought

Droughts are much bigger and slower than other natural disasters that hit Australia - meaning that despite their huge impacts, we still haven't figured out how best to protect ourselves.
The Ord River was targeted for agricultural expansion in the 20th century. isthatdaves/Wikimedia Commons

Water in northern Australia: a history of Aboriginal exclusion

Ever since British settlement, water rights in Australia's north have favoured landowners over traditional owners, effectively locking Aboriginal people out of agricultural development.
Maize is a staple food in South Africa. Its production is likely to decline by half this year due to drought. The poor will be the hardest hit. Shutterstock

South Africa’s poor face rising food prices as drought intensifies

South Africa has been hit by a severe drought and will not be able to produce enough maize - its staple food - in 2016. This will prompt a rise in imports and therefore food prices.
The Murray-Darling: a complex river system with a complex set of regulations to match. AAP Image/Caroline Duncan Photography

Giving water policy to the Nationals could trigger a logjam of bureaucracy

Water isn't straightforward. And by putting the Nationals in charge of policy for water assets like the Murray-Darling Basin, the government will trigger a complex round of bureaucratic musical chairs.
The white paper on developing northern Australia outlines a solid vision - now for action. Andrew Campbell

Is the white paper a game-changer for northern Australia?

The White Paper on Developing Northern Australia represents the most comprehensive attempt yet to think through the development possibilities of the north.
Water from coal seam gas mining would be treated at a reverse osmosis plant before being re-injected into the ground. CSIRO

Can water from coal seam gas be re-injected into the ground?

The Queensland government wants companies to use waste water from coal seam gas extraction for useful purposes such as recharging aquifers. New CSIRO research shows that, with careful monitoring, it can be done.
Australia won’t be building anything as big as the Gordon Dam any time soon. JJ Harrison/Wikimedia Commons

Dam hard: water storage is a historic headache for Australia

The agricultural green paper released last week proposes 27 new water and irrigation projects, which the government claims will be necessary for Australia’s agricultural expansion. The emphasis is firmly…
The Ord River dam, completed in 1971, formed Australia’s largest artificial lake in the far north west. Graeme Churchard/Flickr

Dams are not the smart way to secure water for agriculture

Some 27 irrigation and dam projects are highlighted in the green paper for agricultural competitiveness released this week by agriculture minister Barnaby Joyce. Six of the projects – five in Tasmania…
Right idea, wrong execution: the Ord River irrigation scheme needed better surrounding infrastructure. isthatdave/Wikimedia Commons

To grow agriculture in Australia, farmers need to think like miners

It’s perhaps fitting that mining magnate Andrew Forrest is in the vanguard of a move to position Australia as a major food supplier to China. Fitting, because if the plan is to work, Australian agriculture…

Top contributors

More