Articles on Justin Trudeau

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Canadian troops arrive to a UN base in Gao, Mali, on in June 2018, amid an insurgency by jihadist and ethnic rebel groups. Canada has yet to impose sanctions on the African country because it lacks names to target for asset freezes and other measures. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Canada’s growing challenges with economic sanctions

The federal government has set aside $22.2 million to develop and co-ordinate sanctions while educating Canadians about their obligations. Where to start is the first question.
Why isn’t sustainability a part of accounting training? (Shutterstock)

It’s time to train accountants in sustainability

Despite the leaders of both countries being champions of fighting climate change, research shows both Canada and France are failing to train their accountants in sustainability. Why?
People hold artwork of various marine life and youth during a rally celebrating a recent federal court ruling against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, in Vancouver, on Sept. 8, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

No quick or easy resolution to the Trans Mountain pipeline question

Contrary to what some have suggested, the uncertainty over the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion will be drawn out.
People buy fruits and vegetables in May 2017 at the Jean-Talon farmers market in Montreal. (Shutterstock)

A Canadian food policy moves closer to becoming a reality

A government report on an upcoming national food policy is an optimistic indication that it will result in both healthier and more sustainable food for Canadians and stronger agri-food industry.
In this April 2017 photo, Wisconsin dairy farmer Tim Prosser is seen with his cows. Canada’s tough stance on diafiltered milk via its supply-management system has caused hardship for farmers like Prosser, forced to consider selling their milking cows and shutting down family businesses. (AP Photo/Cara Lombardo)

How the dairy lobby’s cash grab put Canada in Trump’s crosshairs

Canadian dairy farmers were already well-heeled and well-protected from world market forces, but their cash grab over something called diafiltered milk has put the entire Canadian economy at risk.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks at a news conference in Ottawa in June 2018. A United Nations housing watchdog has criticized the Liberals over what it sees as their about-face on a promise to put a human rights lens on its housing strategy. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Canada’s complicated relationship with international human rights law

If the liberal international order is to survive, countries like Canada will need to defend international human rights law.
An asylum-seeker saying he’s from Eritrea is confronted by an RCMP officer as he crosses the border into Canada from the United States on Aug. 21 near Champlain, N.Y. Canadians have false beliefs about the so-called migration crisis, and politicians are capitalizing on it. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Canadian politicians are playing a dangerous game on migration

Canada's opposition Conservatives are borrowing from European populists in stoking fears about asylum-seekers and migrants. Here's why that's so dangerous.
Maxime Bernier announces he will leave the Conservative party during a news conference in Ottawa on Aug. 23, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Maxime Bernier’s bold move

Maxime Bernier has announced he's forming a new conservative party to challenge Andrew Scheer's Conservatives. Don't count him out. Politics has shown us recently that the impossible can happen.
Women were only just granted permission to drive in Saudi Arabia, a kingdom with an atrocious human rights record. Canada can and should leverage its ongoing spat with the country to advocate for human rights across the Middle East. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)

How Canada could use the Saudi quarrel to help the Middle East – and itself

The Saudi-Canadian row offers Canada an opportunity to adopt a new Middle East policy based on universal human rights that address the needs of the many and contributes to regional stability.
Far from a knee-jerk reaction to Toronto’s recent mass shooting, fresh calls for tougher gun control laws have a long history in Canada. A man places his hand on his handgun in B.C. in 2014 during the International Practical Shooting Confederation Canada national championships. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Calls for stronger handgun laws in Canada have deep roots

Calls to outlaw handguns in Canada are hardly knee-jerk proposals in response to violent incidents. Instead, they're in line with the historic Canadian trend to limit the presence of modern pistols.
Activists stage a demonstration against the so-called CETA trade deal outside the European Parliament in Strasbourg, France, in February 2017. (AP Photo/Jean-Francois Badias)Special Instruction

The uncertain future of the Canadian-European trade deal

An imminent court ruling by the European Union will decide the future of the economic partnership between Canada and the EU. It has broader implications for multilateralism in international trade.
Mary Ng is hugged by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau after being sworn in as Minister of Small Business and Export Promotion during a swearing-in ceremony at Rideau Hall on July 18, 2018. The cabinet shuffle sets the stage for the next federal election in the fall of 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Trudeau’s cabinet shuffle patches holes before next election

With a federal election next year, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has shuffled his cabinet. What do the new faces in new jobs tell us about where the government feels it could be challenged?
Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with U.S. President Donald Trump at the G7 leaders summit on June 8, 2018. Trump sent angry tweets about his Canadian host shortly after the summit ended. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Trump-Trudeau tiff is the latest in a history of President-PM disputes

Canadians were shocked by Donald Trump's outburst about Justin Trudeau. Canada and the United States have been allies for more than a century, but there have been disputes between presidents and PMs.
A group of asylum seekers arrive at the temporary housing facilities at the border crossing Wednesday May 9, 2018 in St. Bernard-de-Lacolle, Quebec. Thousands of asylum seekers came into Canada illegally across the Canada-U.S. border in the first quarter of the year, but only a fraction were removed from the country during that time. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

U.S.-Canada agreement on refugees is now unconstitutional

The Safe Third Country Agreement between the United States and Canada was originally intended to deal with refugees seeking asylum. But recent U.S. developments mean the agreement's days are numbered
Demonstrators protest the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion – and compare Justin Trudeau to Donald Trump – at a gathering in Vancouver on May 29, 2018. The controversy over the pipeline requires a national compromise. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Canadians deserve a real pipeline compromise

The Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion is fast becoming one of the most divisive issues in Canadian politics in years. Here's how a compromise can be reached.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with U.S. President Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, D.C. in October 2017. Trump’s tariffs on Canadian aluminum and steel simply reflect a broader U.S. philosophy on international trade, and that doesn’t bode well for Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

How Trump’s tariffs are much bigger than Trump

The underlying problem with Donald Trump's tariffs on steel and aluminum isn't Trump. It's the increasing willingness by the U.S. to impose its will on its neighbours amid rising economic nationalism.

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