Articles on Justin Trudeau

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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, left, has promised support for scientific research as the United States under President Donald Trump has made moves to change leadership and cut funding for scientific agencies and programs. The men are seen in this file photo at the White House last February. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick)

Canada must make science great again

Canada must take the lead as a global champion of science as America under President Donald Trump presses its assault on fact and knowledge.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has apologized to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and two-spirited people who were forced out of the military or public service and some who were even prosecuted criminally for “gross indecency.” (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

LGBTQ2 apology is a good start, but it’s not enough

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau plans to make a formal apology to LGBTQ2 communities for past state-sanctioned discrimination against them in Canada. But the apology must be more than just words.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Dr. Mona Nemer, Canada’s new chief science adviser, check out a robot that launches balls, with science fair participants Van Bernat and Kate O'Melia of Governor Simcoe Secondary School in St. Catharines, Ont., on Parliament Hill in September. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick)

Science in Canada needs funding, not photo-ops

Science funding still falls short of 2005 levels. It's time for Canada's government to fix that problem, before it's too late.
Maggie Cywink, of Whitefish River First Nation, holds up a sign behind Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau during a summit in Ottawa in support of missing and murdered Indigenous women. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Why the Indigenous in New Zealand have fared better than those in Canada

The Indigenous in New Zealand have fared better than First Nations in Canada in terms of self-determination. Why? It's about a lot more than geography, land mass and language.
Finance Minister Bill Morneau is not the first Canadian politician to hold the job who’s been confronted with outrage over tax reform proposals. But it’s time to listen to people who get riled up about tax increases. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Why we should listen to people angry about their taxes

Outrage over tax reform is nothing new. But if we can't be calm about tax, we can at least learn from the stories spoken in anger.
Jagmeet Singh won 53.6 per cent of the first-ballot votes on Sunday to become the new leader of Canada’s New Democratic Party. (The Canadian Press/Chris Young)

What Jagmeet Singh’s historic NDP leadership win means for Canada

Jagmeet Singh has become the first ethnic minority to become leader of a federal political party. Will his message of "love and courage" best Justin Trudeau's "sunny ways" in the next federal election?
Canada’s former prime minister, Stephen Harper, is greeted by a Maori warrior in New Zealand in November 2014. New Zealand’s electoral system allows for far greater Indigenous involvement than Canada’s. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Lessons for Canada in New Zealand’s Indigenous-friendly electoral system

As New Zealanders head to the polls this week, there are lessons for Canada in the country's electoral system — in particular how it gives Indigenous people a greater role in governing.
People shouting and yelling slogans during a protest in front of the US Consulate to denounce Donald Trump’s immigration policies on January 30, 2017 in Toronto, Canada. (Shutterstock)

Quiet Canadian, ugly American: Does racism differ north of the border?

Media pundits are promoting Canada as exceptional in its tolerance and diversity but the truth is, Canadians have a tendency not to be not less racist than Americans, but to be less loud about it.
U.S. President Donald Trump enjoys some time in the cab of a mover truck parked at the White House in March when truckers and industry CEOs came for a discussion on health care. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

NAFTA talks see Trump in driver’s seat – and Canada at risk

Mexico has traditionally been NAFTA's biggest loser. But Canada is at risk if the U.S. gets its way in removing a dispute settlement mechanism from the deal in the upcoming NAFTA renegotiations.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau welcomes Syrian refugees arriving in Canada in December 2015.

Canada’s Syrian refugees ill-served by media coverage

News organizations have a powerful role in informing the public about refugee and migrant issues. Research shows they've struggled to do so in a way that humanizes Syrian refugees.
A U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer hands documents to a woman entering the U.S. from Mexico. Brad Doherty/AP Photo

Rewriting NAFTA has serious implications beyond just trade

President Trump wants to renegotiate or eliminate NAFTA because of its impact on U.S. trade, but the accord is also a cornerstone of continental cooperation on security issues as well.
Two Canadian soldiers during a 2011 NATO exercise in Ukraine. U.S. Army Europe/Flickr

‘Warrior nation’ or ‘peacekeeper’: Canada’s dilemmas

Over its history Canada has built itself through war and the memory of its wars. The country's recent military interventions are part of a struggle to define what the country stands for.
The relationship between Canada’s Aboriginal peoples and non-indigenous population has never been an equal one. AAP Image/Adam Gartrell

Canada’s progress shows indigenous reconciliation is a long-term process

The relationship between Canada's Aboriginal peoples and non-indigenous population has never been an equal one, even though the 1982 national constitution recognises Aboriginal rights.

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