Articles on media studies

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Fear of the unknown: would free radio broadcasts hurt gate receipts? glove and radio from www.shutterstock.com

When baseball almost banned broadcasts

With owners deeply divided over radio, a 20-year tug-of-war would ensue.
Popular Latino musicians like Café Tacvba didn’t make an appearance. Ruy Landa/Flickr

Where were the Latinos at South by Southwest?

At an event that bills itself as 'the place to preview the technology of tomorrow today,' one of the fastest-growing, youngest and most tech-savvy segments of the population was largely ignored.
Vladimir Putin appears on the Kremlin-backed news network Russia Today. The multi-platform channel has already garnered more than 2 billion views on YouTube, making it the most-watched news network on the video-sharing website. Kremlin.ru/Wikimedia Commons

Russia fighting information wars with borrowed weapons

The airwaves arms race is on, and the Kremlin has taken a page from the playbook of its Cold War nemesis.
Studies have shown that mentioning misinformation – even in the process of combating it – can cause it to stick in listeners’ minds. from www.shutterstock.com

The media fuels vaccination myths – by trying to correct them

Studies show that the more familiar we become with false information, the more likely we are to later remember it as fact.
Workshops that teach scientists about public communication and advocacy are growing in popularity. Career ambition rather than politics appears to be a main motivation behind scientists’ desire to engage the public. SISSA

Inside America’s science lobby: What motivates AAAS members to engage the public?

At their annual meetings last month, leaders of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) urged their members to advocate on behalf of federal funding for scientific research, actions…
Star Trek fans were especially drawn to Leonard Nimoy’s Mr. Spock – who showed many that it “was okay to be a nerd, that even in the future not everyone fit in, or needed to.” Sam Howzit/Flickr

One of the family: Leonard Nimoy’s impact on fandom

Star Trek fans were especially drawn to Leonard Nimoy's Mr. Spock – who showed many that it "was okay to be a nerd, that even in the future not everyone fit in, or needed to."
NBC newscaster John Cameron Swayze was television’s first “anchor man” – though not for presenting the news. The term referred to his status as permanent panelist of the quiz show Who Said That? Wikimedia Commons

The origins of the all-powerful news anchor

In the beginning, newscasters weren’t even visible to TV news viewers. With Walter Cronkite, everything changed.

Media studies goes (back) to school

There was a brief flurry of panic as Ofqual, the UK government agency charged with looking after school qualifications, left both film studies and media studies out of the list of subjects students would…
Media studies is on offer at top-tier universities. wayneandwax

Top universities teach media studies, so why brief against it?

Media studies gets a hard time in higher education and the top universities in the UK are not making things any easier by continuing to take a contradictory stance as they advise students on what to study…

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