Articles on Military ethics

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Psychologists aren’t supposed to be involved in torture. In this 2009 file photo a sign marks a closed-off area at Camp Justice, the location of the US Military Commissions court for war crimes, at the US Naval Base, in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Witness-Guantanamo/Reuters/Brennan Linsley/Pool/Files

An ethics lesson for psychologists: don’t participate in torture

Why hasn’t the American Psychological Association prohibited members from participating in interrogations? And what are future psychologists learning about military medical ethics?
A MQ-9 Reaper Drone has an operational cost one-fifth of the F35 Joint Strike Fighter. So should drones replace soldiers in military warfare? US Air Force

Drones are cheap, soldiers are not: a cost-benefit analysis of war

Cost is largely absent in the key debates around the use of unmanned drones in war, even though drones are a cost-effective way of achieving national security objectives. Many of the common objections…
US army ‘deserter’ Bowe Bergdahl had deep and abiding questions about the justice of the cause he signed up for. EPA/IntelCenter

Deserters aren’t born, but made: Bowe Bergdahl and moral injury

The public debate around the recent prisoner swap that saw US Army sergeant Bowe Bergdahl returned from five years’ imprisonment in Afghanistan in exchange for five senior Taliban leaders has had two main…

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