Articles on Rio 2016

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Bolting past the finish line. ave Thompson / PA Archive/Press Association Images

How to find your best running style

In order to become a better runner, you need to consider these factors first.
Jim Thorpe and Ben Johnson were both banned from the Olympics. But if each had played at different points in history, they would have been allowed to compete. Nick Lehr/The Conversation

When doping wasn’t considered cheating

In sports, what's considered fair play has changed throughout history. At one point, even looking 'too poor' was grounds for exclusion.
Will the Winning Edge strategy impact sport participation and limit sports’ abilities to develop Olympic champions? reuters photographer/reuters

Are the Rio 2016 Games a true measure of Australia’s Winning Edge?

Australia has had a good start to the Rio Olympics. But does that mean that the strategy created in response to Australia's poor Olympic performance in 2012 is working?
Gold medal winner Mack Horton (centre) said he had no time or respect for drug cheats in reference to silver medallist Sun Yang. Dominic Ebenbichler/Reuters

Horton wins by naming the elephant in the room at Rio Olympics

Rarely do we see such unscripted individual honesty on difficult topics such as doping, right in the middle of arguably the biggest international sporting stage.
Rugby Sevens serves as the perfect example of how lifelong dedication to a single sport might not be the only pathway to Olympic success. Ahmed Jadallah/Reuters

Why talent transfer is key for a winning rugby Sevens team

The gold medal-winning Australian women's rugby Sevens team is a shining example of talent transfer from other sports.
Once the pageantry is over, many Olympic athletes have to return to normal life – which means figuring out how to make a living. Tony Gentile/Reuters

How do Olympic athletes pay the electric bill?

A former Olympic gold medalist reflects on his own financial struggles as he trained and competed for the 1984 Games. Decades later, not much has changed for many Olympians.
Athletes seek to gain competitive advantages in lots of different ways and many of these are not banned. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Why is doping wrong anyway?

Doping simply gives athletes an advantage that can be compared to other forms of training regimes. So why the moral outrage?
News about the sewage and pollution in Guanabara Bay in Rio have caused health concerns among Olympic athletes. Ricardo Moraes/Reuters

Brazil’s sewage woes reflect the growing global water quality crisis

Wastewater treatment systems around the world are hamstrung by outdated tests that don't identify a growing array of pathogens or identify the sources of pollutants.
Reuters/Ruben Sprich

Rubbishing Rio – someone’s got to do it

Unless they start giving Olympic gongs for curmudgeonly whinging, I don’t think I’m in the running “to medal”, as we apparently say these days. I realise I should be feeling a surge of patriotic pride…
The bodies of Olympic athletes are becoming more specialised, more differentiated – and much more extreme. Reuters/Max Rossi

Survival of the fittest: the changing shapes and sizes of Olympic athletes

Over time, the body sizes and shapes of Olympians have been moving apart from each other at light-speed, and have become increasingly specialised and differentiated.
A protester holds up a sticker reading ‘boycott’ during anti-Olympic protests in Brazil. Reuters

In no mood for games: the pale Olympic flame of Rio 2016

Protests against the Rio Olympics must be understood in the context of the growing global reaction to both the way these mega-events are organised and the entities promoting them.

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