Articles on Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody

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Four Corners has refocused national attention on Indigenous incarceration rates, but there are several problems with prison data collections. AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Data gaps mean Indigenous incarceration rates may be even worse than we thought

The official data show incarceration rates of Indigenous people have doubled since the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody 25 years ago. But the problem may be even worse than that.
Protestors in Perth call for an independent investigation into Ms Dhu’s death. AAP/Jesse Roberts

Why we should honour the humanity of every person who dies in custody

The statistics used to discuss deaths in custody can make us lose sight of the fact that it's people we're talking about. People with families and friends, who died prematurely – and often brutally.
The royal commission was highly critical of police investigating other police officers, but police remain responsible for investigating deaths in custody in most Australian jurisdictions. Rae Allen/Flickr

Scales of justice still tipped towards police who harm people in their custody

Accountability for the deaths of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people at the hands of the state remains absent 25 years after the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody's report.
A harsh criminal justice system – in particular, more prisons and people behind bars – has apparently become a hallmark of good government. AAP/Dave Hunt

How ‘tough on crime’ politics flouts death-in-custody recommendations

Australia has become less compassionate, more punitive and more ready to blame individuals for their alleged failings since the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody.
Electronic monitoring typically involves fitting offenders with tamper-proof bracelets to monitor whether they are abiding by conditions imposed on them. Flickr/Chris Yarzab

Electronic innovation can help fix an archaic, crowded prison system

The days of prison, an 18th-century industrial institution, as the justice system's dominant form of punishment may be numbered. Electronic monitoring of offenders is one promising alternative.
For a modest amount, the Custody Notification Service provides NSW with one of the most effective strategies in curbing Indigenous deaths in police custody.` shutterstock

NSW ditches another protection for Indigenous people in custody

Without the Custody Notification Service in NSW, deaths of Indigenous people in police custody will almost certainly increase, along with the over-representation of Indigenous people in prison.
The Northern Territory’s ‘paperless arrest’ powers are at odds with recommendations by the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody. Shutterstock/Igor Golovniov

Paperless arrests are a sure-fire trigger for more deaths in custody

Northern Territory police powers to make 'paperless arrests' are completely contrary to recommendations by the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, and now the inevitable has happened.

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