Articles on Sulawesi

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The coastline of Sulawesi, Indonesia, where languages and cultures are threatened by climate change. Anastasia Riehl

The impact of climate change on language loss

Approximately 7,000 languages are spoken in the world today, but only about half are expected to survive this century. One factor contributing to this loss is climate change.
In this Oct. 10, 2018, photo, a man walks past a boat swept ashore by a tsunami in Wani village on the outskirt of Palu, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia. The 7.5 magnitude earthquake on Sept. 28, triggered a tsunami and mudslides. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara, File)

Why some earthquakes are so deadly

Last month's earthquake in Sulawesi, Indonesia was large, but not huge. It was the aftereffects that made it so devastating.
A bridge in Palu, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia, was destroyed in the recent earthquake and tsunami. AP Photo/Aaron Favila

An Indonesian city’s destruction reverberates across Sulawesi

The devastation of the recent earthquake and tsunami might be most visible in Palu, the capital city of Central Sulawesi. But the province’s rural areas could ultimately suffer the most.
One of the survivors of Indonesia’s 1965-1966 anti-communist violence, Sa'anah from Palu, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia. Adrian Mulya, from Penyintas Kehidupan [Winners of Life], Jakarta: KPG, 2014.

Palu earthquake and tsunami swept away some of Indonesia’s most important human rights activism

Palu, the capital city of Central Sulawesi province in Indonesia, recently devastated by an earthquake and tsunami, is a trailblazing city with progressive human rights initiatives.
Sulawesi, part of the biogeographical region of Wallacea, is home to tarsiers – tiny, goggle-eyed creatures look more like mammalian tree frogs than monkeys. Ondrej Prosicky/www.shutterstock.com

Wallacea: a living laboratory of evolution

The central islands of Indonesia, also known as Wallacea, is a place of wonder, a living laboratory for the study of evolution.

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