Articles on Supreme Court

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Women earn less than men in most occupations, including soccer. AP Photo/Jessica Hill

Why women still earn a lot less than men

A decade ago, President Obama signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, the latest legislative effort to close the persistent gap between how much women and men earn. Here's why it hasn’t made much of a difference.
Letter from President Trump to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. AP/Wayne Partlow

Separation of powers: An invitation to struggle

After the recent government shutdown and breakdowns in functioning within all three branches, it looks like the separation of powers system is broken or unbalanced. It is – and it isn't.
The New York district attorney dropped a financial fraud investigation of Ivanka Trump, left, and her brother, Donald Jr., right. AP/Seth Wenig

There’s a wider scandal suggested by the Trump investigations

The investigations into the financial dealings of Donald Trump and his associates join a growing body of evidence pointing to lax enforcement of certain high-level financial crime.
The nation’s founders saw education as key to self-rule. Joseph Sohm/www.shutterstock.com

Fight for federal right to education takes a new turn

The Supreme Court long ago rejected the idea of a federal right to education. Can a series of new lawsuits convince the court to change its mind?
Supreme Court justices stood with Brett Kavanaugh, his wife Ashley, President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump on the day of Kavanaugh’s investiture. AP/Supreme Court provided

Kavanaugh’s impact on the Supreme Court and the country may not be as profound as predicted

With Brett Kavanaugh on the Supreme Court, many predict that the court will move to the right on issues from abortion to gun rights. But Supreme Court rulings are often not the last word on a matter.
Activists demonstrate in front of the Supreme Court to protest the confirmation vote of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Why the Kavanaugh hearings were a show trial gone bad

The bitterly contested hearings to confirm Brett Kavanaugh as the newest justice to the U.S. Supreme Court were more of a show trial than a legal procedure.
Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, arrives in the East Room of the White House, July 9, 2018. AP/Alex Brandon

Does a man’s social class have anything to do with the likelihood he’ll commit sexual assault?

Brett Kavanaugh presented himself as a good and reputable man in his recent Senate hearing. But a man's social status and education tell us nothing about whether he's likely to commit sexual assault.
Judge Brett Kavanaugh appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 27. Saul Loeb/Pool Image via AP

Interruptions at Supreme Court confirmation hearings have been rising since the 1980s

One striking feature of Brett Kavanaugh's testimony was the number of times he interrupted. Data shows that hearing interruptions are becoming more common, particularly when the nominee is female.
Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg paying a courtesy call on Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, D-N.Y., left, and Sen. Joseph Biden, D-Del., in June 1993, before her confirmation hearing for the Supreme Court. AP/Marcy Nighswander

Ruth Bader Ginsburg helped shape the modern era of women’s rights – before she went on the Supreme Court

Before she became a Supreme Court justice, Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s work as an attorney in the 1970s fundamentally changed the court’s approach to women's rights and how we think about women – and men.

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