Articles on Zika virus

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Most cases of Zika are asymptomatic. Airman Magazine/U.S. Air Force Photo/Tech. Sgt. Brandon Shapiro/Flickr

Zika virus: Only a few small outbreaks likely to occur in the continental US

A computer model suggests that while more cases of Zika can be expected in the continental U.S. outbreaks will probably be small and are not projected to spread.
A woman looks at a CDC health advisory sign about Zika at Miami International Airport Carlo Allegri/Reuters

US response to Zika: Fragmented and uneven

Politics, not epidemiology or medicine, drives government responses to disease. Politicians are the ultimate decision-makers in public health, and they must respond to political forces.
Talking with patients who’ve had Zika is tough. Pregnant woman and doctor image via www.shutterstock.com.

I’m an OB-GYN treating women with Zika: This is what it’s like

Physicians like me are learning about Zika along with our patients. This takes a dose of humility on our part and an understanding from our patients that we learn something new every single day.
A display used to educate the public on rubella vaccination and the mother-to-fetus transmission of this virus. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention via Public Health Image Library

In Zika, echoes of US rubella outbreak of 1964-65

Though separated by time and place, there are surprising similarities in the the social issues raised by the rubella outbreak of 1964-65 and the recent Zika outbreak in South America.
A new mathematical model has predicted Zika will soon stop spreading due to mass immunity. Martial Trezzini/EPA/AAP

Is the end of Zika nigh? How populations develop immunity

During a disease outbreak, lots of people can become infected in a short time and develop immunity, making it hard for the pathogen to spread.
Man in a hospital via Shutterstock. From www.shutterstock.com

What will it take to reduce infections in the hospital?

Thousands of people acquire infections while hospitalized. Many are caused by urinary catheters, a routine part of a hospital stay. But cutting back on their usage can lower infection rates.
Is a Zika vaccine being tested ahead of vaccines for other flaviviruses because Zika’s occurring in the context of an international sporting competition? Christian Bruna/AAP

News of Zika vaccine might be reassuring, but it’s too late for Rio, and do we really need it anyway?

Recently two events concerning the Zika epidemic coincided: two potential vaccines against the virus were declared a success when used in mice, and Jason Day withdrew from the Olympic Games.
A patient with symptoms of the Chikungunya virus in a Dominican hospital. Outbreaks have been reported in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Reuters/Ricardo Rojas

Chikungunya epidemic casts its pall: what you should know

There is no vaccine to prevent or medicine to treat the chikungunya virus infection. The only available method of prevention is through shielding people from mosquito bites.
A human-dependent mosquito, the range of the disease-carrying Aedes aegypti is projected to grow in the U.S. and affect more people globally. sanofi-pasteur/flickr

Global warming to expose more people to Zika-spreading mosquito Aedes aegypti

More people in the U.S. and world will be exposed to the disease-carrying mosquito Aedes aegypti, not just because of warmer temperatures but global population changes as well.
Are Olympic athletes, officials, reporters and spectators at risk travelling to this Zika-affected city? Marcelo Sayao/AAP

Will Zika virus cast a shadow over the Rio Olympics?

The outbreak of mosquito-borne Zika virus in South America has cast a shadow over preparations for the Olympic and Paralympic Games to be held in Rio de Janerio.

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