Articles sur Genealogy

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Many genealogy forums recently claimed their distant ancestor, the French-born Catherine Pillard was Indigenous. Pillard arrived with other women in Quebec in the 17th century as depicted in this painting. Charles William Jefferys / Library and Archives Canada

How some North Americans claim a false Indigenous identity

Recently in Canada and the United States, a small, but vocal minority of white French-descendants have used an ancestor born between 300 and 400 years ago to claim an "Indigenous" identity.
Genealogy is the second most popular hobby in the United States. Steve Allen/Shutterstock.com

Genes and genealogy and making the most of famous relations

Before you attribute a trait to a famous ancestor like George Washington or Marie Antoinette, you might want to see how much DNA you actually share with these people. It's not what you thought.
The issues surrounding the use of genetic data are complex. image created by James Hereward and Caitlin Curtis

Dramatic advances in forensics expose the need for genetic data legislation

Police have powerful new genetic tools. How are we going to regulate their use? A Genetic Data Protection Act is one solution to ensure confidence in the way DNA is accessed and used.
Genetic ancestry testing might all seem like harmless fun, but there is a downside. (Shutterstock)

Genetic ancestry tests don’t change your identity, but you might

The results of genetic ancestry tests are grossly over-simplified. A new study shows the tests reinforce what you want to believe rather than offering objective, scientific proof of who you are.
Joseph James DeAngelo, 72, who authorities suspect is the so-called Golden State Killer responsible for at least a dozen murders and 50 rapes in the 1970s and ‘80s, during his arraignment on April 27, 2018, in Sacramento, Calif. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

How cops used a public genealogy database in the Golden State Killer case

A public genealogy data base was used to track down the so-called "Golden State Killer," raising concerns about the privacy of using public sites to fill out our family trees.
We want to know we are connected - yet we crave to be unique. Moral white panic is also involved and so is big business. (Shutterstock)

The mythical quest for our ancestors is big business

The current craze to search for our ancestry is complicated and paradoxical. We want to know we are connected -- yet we crave to be unique. Moral white panic is also involved and so is big business.
Métis Family and a Red River Cart, 1883. (State Historical Society of North Dakota, A4365)

Becoming Indigenous: The rise of Eastern Métis in Canada

New census data sheds light on the country's Indigenous population. In Eastern Canada, the rise in people claiming to be “Métis” is a controversial case of "settler self-indigenization."
Wangaratta police at the capture of Ned Kelly in 1880. William Edward Barnes/ State Library of Victoria

Who will be Australia’s future folk heroes?

Was Ned Kelly a Robin Hood warrior or a lone wolf/dangerous criminal/whacko? Given enough cultural oxygen, outlaws are apt to become folk heroes - something today's shock jocks might care to remember.

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