Articles sur History

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Even common knowledge isn’t immune. ledokolua/Shutterstock.com

Writing’s power to deceive

Reading something that sows doubt about a widely agreed-upon fact – even the election of George Washington as president – can have a profound effect.
One of the paradoxes of wage policy is that ultimately governments are held responsible and blamed for poor results, but governments are but one player in a complex system of wage adjustment. Lukas Coch/AAP

Governments shouldn’t be so hasty in declaring victory on wages policy

History tells us governments do not always get what they wish for, and in fact often perverse outcomes flow from policy choices.
An ex-8th Division prisoner of war is reunited with his family at Ingleburn POW reception camp in New South Wales, November 1945. Ernest McQuillan/Australian War Memorial

Friday essay: ‘It’s not over in the homes’ – impotence, domestic violence and former POWs

Over 20,000 former POWs returned to Australia at the end of the second world war. Archival research sheds light on those who struggled to readjust to life here - and the impact on their wives.
A painting by Sakubei Yamamoto. Yamamoto Family/Collection Yamamoto Sakubee

The “Pitmen painters” of England and Japan

Throughout the centuries, a number of coal miners have documented their lives with paintings. Some of their works are now in museums and bring the stories of the "pitmen" back to life.
It is commonly thought that anyone in ancient Rome who killed his father, mother, or another relative was subjected to the ‘punishment of the sack’. But is this true? Creative Commons

Mythbusting Ancient Rome: cruel and unusual punishment

From being thrown off a cliff to being sewn into a sack with animals, ancient Rome is notorious for its cruel and unusual punishments. But we must be careful what we take as historical fact.
Swan River Colony. Jane Eliza, Currie Panorama of the Swan River Settlement via Wikimedia Commons

The story of Australia’s last convicts

A century and a half after the last convict ship docked in Australia, new research is uncovering what happened to those who were transported.

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