Articles sur Jews

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Bahrain’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Shaikh Khalid bin Ahmed bin Mohammed Al Khalifa gave an interview to Israel’s Channel 13 in June – a first. Screenshot, Official Youtube of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Kingdom of Bahrain

Why increasing Arab-Israeli closeness matters

With the opening of a synagogue in Dubai and warmer relations between Saudi Arabia and Israel, some Arab states suddenly appear to be more open to friendship with Israel and Jews. Why?
“Give me your tired and your poor who can stand on their own two feet. And who will not become a public charge,” said Acting head of Citizenship and Immigration Services Ken Cuccinelli. AP Photo/Seth Wenig

Trump administration revives public charge clause that kept Nazi-era refugees from the US

During the Nazi era, roughly 300,000 additional Jewish refugees could have gained entry to the U.S. But the immigration law’s “likely to become a public charge” clause kept them out.
Adolf Hitler (second from the right in front) is shown in this 1939 file photo along with German and Italian army chiefs after having signed the German-Italian military pact in Germany. AP

I was an expert witness against a teacher who taught students to question the Holocaust

A scholar's efforts to learn how textbooks in New Jersey were portraying the Holocaust leads her to testify against a history teacher who taught his students to question if the Holocaust took place.
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, right, and former Israeli Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman. AP Photo/Bernat Armangue, File

What Israel’s new election reveals about the struggle over Jewishness

Young Haredim men, who are strictly observant Jews, have long been exempted from Israel's compulsory military service. A disagreement over stopped Netanyahu from forming a government.
People hold up signs as they march during a demonstration in Montreal, April 7, 2019, in opposition to the Quebec government’s newly tabled Bill 21. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Clashing rights: Behind the Québec hijab debate

The proposed secular law (Bill 21) in the province of Québec appears to be directed primarily against Montreal and Québec City, and reflects a fear of strangers in Québec’s more homogeneous regions.
Chen Yabian, 74, of Hainan Province, southern China, testifies during the International Symposium on Chinese ‘Comfort Women’ in 2000 in Shanghai that she was 14 when Japanese Imperial Army soldiers forced her to work as a sex slave during the war. AP/Eugene Hoshiko

Recent attempts at reparations show that World War II is not over

US agreements with Germany, France, Switzerland and Austria provide reparations to WWII victims. But an international law scholar writes that the US has failed to address war crimes in Asia.
A student speaks with Holocaust survivor William Morgan using an interactive virtual conversation exhibit at the the Holocaust Museum Houston in January 2019. David J. Phillip/AP

Digital technology offers new ways to teach lessons from the Holocaust

In anticipation of International Holocaust Remembrance Day, a scholar explains how digital technologies can help close knowledge gaps about the catastrophe that claimed the lives of 6 million Jews.
Supporters of Shiite Houthi rebels attend a rally in Sanaa, Yemen, in 2017. AP Photo/Hani Mohammed, File

Who are Yemen’s Houthis?

The Houthis belong to the Shiite branch of Islam. The Houthi insurgency began in the early 1990s, spurred in part by growing influence of different Sunni branches of Islam.
In the United States, Hanukkah has gained much significance. Tercer Ojo Photography/Shutterstock.com

How Hanukkah came to America

Hanukkah is ranked one of Judaism's minor festivals. It's popularity in the US has a lot to do with the country's history.
A memorial outside Pittsburgh’s Tree of Life Synagogue on Oct. 29, 2018, erected after a gunman killed 11 worshippers at the temple. AP/Gene J. Puskar)

America’s dark history of organized anti-Semitism re-emerges in today’s far-right groups

American anti-Semitism took an organized form in the 20th century. The German American Bund and the Silver Legion developed a unique culture of hatred for Jews that persists today in alt-right groups.
For decades, native-born American Jews changed their names to improve their job prospects. Billion Photos/Shutterstock.com

Why are some Americans changing their names?

The demographics of name change petitioners today – and the reasons that they give – tell a complicated story of race, class and culture.

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