Articles on Adam Smith

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There already exist some promising new antibiotic therapies, and more are in the pipeline. However, our economic model prevents researchers from moving them out onto the market. (Shutterstock)

Humanity under threat from antibiotic-resistant infections

The end of effective antibiotics will be frightening. Life expectancy will fall dramatically and people of all ages will die from illnesses that we are used to treating with $10 worth of pills.
Andrew Simms (New Weather Institute), Sally Svenlen (RE student), Larry Elliott (Guardian), Steve Keen (Debunking Economics) and Kate Raworth (Doughnut Economics) symbolically nail the “33 Theses” to the door of the London School of Economics in December 2017. rethinkeconomics.org

Debate: What is missing in the ‘33 Theses for an Economics Reformation’

Nailed to the door of the London School of Economics, the ‘33 Theses’ offer a long overdue challenge to economics dogma. But there are omissions as well.
There’s a reason they call them ‘impulse purchases.’ frankieleon/Flickr

The dark side of free markets

While free markets have delivered benefits, they also prey on our weaknesses, tempting us to buy things that are bad for us, be it sweet candy or sour investments.
Hamilton’s political enemies unduly tarnished his legacy. 'Hamilton' via www.shutterstock.com

It’s all about the Hamiltons, baby

Alexander Hamilton's story is our story. It would be a mistake to remove him from the $10 bill.
Zannoni’s 1771 Map of the British Isles shows the heart of the “civilised” world – at least according to Adam Smith when he was writing The Wealth of Nations. Wikimedia Commons/Geographicus Rare Antique Maps

Savage peoples: the racism of Adam Smith in Wealth of Nations

To burnish the virtues of "civilised" Europe, Adam Smith relies on a barrage of racial insults. Where did his information about the so-called "savage peoples" come from in the first place?
A fantasy about free markets in primitive society lies at the heart of Adam Smith’s wealth of nations – but did they ever exist? Steve Rhodes/Flickr

The myth that holds Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations together

The myth that our primitive forebears were capitalists at heart is fundamental to Adam Smith's arguments in The Wealth of Nations.
Adam Smith used parables, morality tales, and canine analogies to explain his theories of economics. Kasper Flörchinger

How cute dogs help us understand Adam Smith’s ‘invisible hand’

A careful study of Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations reveals that its influence lies not in Smith’s ability to construct an argument – but in his skill as teller of tall tales.
Welcome to the party: a time for giving. Frank Tasche

Priceless: the inefficient, but merry economics of Christmas

Fingers crossed, we are soon to be inundated with Christmas joy disguised as presents from our family and friends. I received my first card more than a week ago and a present – now sitting under the tree…
I bet that you look good on your tax forms… Yui Mok/PA

Don’t knock Arctic Monkeys – most of us are tax avoiders

Arctic Monkeys became members of a club they would probably have rather avoided recently. Joining the likes of Take That, Jimmy Carr and Anne Robinson, they became the latest celebrities to be vilified…

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