Articles on Anxiety

Displaying 1 - 20 of 151 articles

Generally people drink to either increase positive emotions or decrease negative ones. from shutterstock.com

There are four types of drinker – which one are you?

There are many reasons people drink, including to have fun or cope with other problems. Knowing their motivations will allow us to tailor programs to help those who may struggle with alcohol use.
Anxiety and depression are the top reasons that college students seek counseling, a new report shows. Shutterstock.com

1 in 5 college students have anxiety or depression. Here’s why

On the heels of a new report that shows depression and anxiety are the top reasons college students seek counseling, a psychiatry professor lists a variety of factors behind the trend.
A one-size-fits-all approach to mental health does not speak to the diversity of Canada’s immigrant population. Here a man participates in a mass meditation on the lawn of Parliament Hill in Ottawa, in September 2017. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick)

Let’s Talk about culturally sensitive treatments for depression

As Bell Let's Talk Day approaches, we profile mental health experts practicing culturally sensitive treatments for depression and anxiety among Canada's immigrant, refugee and Indigenous communities.
Excessively protecting your child and taking over, doesn’t allow them to learn through experience. Shutterstock

Back to school blues: how to help your child with shyness

Loving parent can think of nothing more important than protecting their shy children, but excessively protecting your child and taking over doesn’t allow them to learn through experience.
Even Santa can get worn out, which can lead to getting the blues. Stokkete

What psychiatrists have to say about holiday blues

Have you ever felt more like singing the blues during the holidays than "Deck the Halls"? You're not alone. Two psychiatrists explain why people feel blue during this time and share tips for how to take care.
The largest differences in early death between those with and without mental disorders were for respiratory diseases and alcohol misuse. Jake Oates

People with mental illness still die a decade earlier than those without

Despite efforts to address the issue, the life expectancy gap between those with and without mental illness has remained consistent over two decades. However the causes of death have changed.
Parenting programs and home visiting programs can offer vital support to mothers struggling with mental illness, substance use, and other challenges. Research shows that avoiding foster care is better for the health of mother and child. (Shutterstock)

Foster care damages the health of mothers

New research shows that having a child in foster care is often harmful to a mother's mental and physical health.
Scary pumpkins are the least of what frightens us at Halloween, a day devoted to being frightened. asife/Shutterstock.com

The science of fright: Why we love to be scared

We may pretend that we do not like fear, but Halloween proves otherwise. Many of us enjoy being scared. But why?
People who unexpectedly lose a loved should be identified early enough and appropriately counselled. Mohammad Ponir Hossain/Reuters.

What can be done to improve treatment for PTSD after a loss

The unexpected death of a loved one is a traumatic experience. It's important to identify high risk individuals to provide counselling and social support.
A recent Canadian trial reports breast cancer over-diagnosis rates of up to 55 per cent, from routine screening mammograms. (Shutterstock)

Routine mammograms do not save lives: The research is clear

October is breast cancer awareness month. Women should know there is no reliable evidence that routine mammograms reduce death from breast cancer, and there's good evidence that they cause harm.
Understanding the source of child anxiety is important. Some fears may be easily soothed; others, such as fears of bullying, may require adult intervention. (Shutterstock)

Back-to-school anxiety? Here are seven simple solutions

As the first days of school approach rapidly, an educational psychologist offers strategies for combating anxiety in children and teens.
Generic plotting of ‘green space’ on an urban plan does not target mental wellbeing unless it is designed to engage us with the sights, sounds and smells of nature. Zoe Myers

Green for wellbeing – science tells us how to design urban spaces that heal us

Successful parks and urban green spaces encourage us to linger, to rest, to walk for longer. That, in turn, provides the time to maximise the restorative mental benefits.

Top contributors

More