Articles on Cardiovascular disease

Displaying 1 - 20 of 92 articles

The flu shot decrease the risk of heart attacks in healthy individuals, according to research. Here, pipettes containing immune cells for testing against possible flu vaccines are seen at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., in 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Get the flu shot – to lower your risk of a heart attack

Your risk of a heart attack increases 600 per cent within a week of catching the flu. The flu shot decreases that risk, whether you catch the flu or not.
Heart attacks increase with lower air temperature, lower atmospheric air pressure, higher wind velocity, shorter sunshine duration and colder weather. from shutterstock.com

Heart attacks more frequent in colder weather

Doctors have long acknowledged heart attacks are more likely to occur in cold weather. But now a major study has confirmed it.
For decades, doctors have been prescribing low-dose aspirin for healthy people over the age of 70. from shutterstock.com

Daily low-dose aspirin doesn’t reduce heart-attack risk in healthy people

Taking low-dose aspirin daily doesn't delay the onset of disability in healthy older people. Nor does it prevent heart attack or stroke in those who hadn't experienced either condition before.
Only around half of at-risk Indigenous Australians are taking preventative medication for heart disease. from www.shutterstock.com

Getting a heart check early can prevent heart attack and stroke in Indigenous Australians

A new study has found too few Indigenous people are getting health checks, despite their elevated risk of heart problems.
In low-resource settings many patients cannot access the tests they need for accurate diagnosis, treatment and a chance of survival. Here, patients wait in the Edna Adan University Hospital in Somalia, 2010. (Shutterstock)

The desperate global need for medical diagnostics

The World Health Organization has made bold progress by including many tests for non-communicable diseases on its new 'Essential Diagnostics List.'
College is a fun time for young adults, but it can also become an unhealthy time. oneinchpunch/Shutterstock.com

College students may not be as heart-healthy as they think

College students may think they are living a fit life, but a recent study adds to growing research that suggests that many students are developing risk factors for heart disease.
Trade and investment agreements can increase consumption of unhealthy foods, sugary drinks and tobacco – leading to soaring rates of obesity and chronic diseases globally. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

The hidden connection between obesity, heart disease and trade

As government representatives meet at the WHO global conference on noncommunicable diseases in Uruguay this week, their focus should be on reducing the health impacts of trade deals.
When we sit, we accumulate calories and excess fat which can cause obesity, diabetes, cancer, heart disease and death. The solution may be as simple as counting. (Shutterstock)

How to stop sitting yourself to death

If you sit all day at work, then cancer, diabetes, heart disease and death are the likely outcomes. A cardiologist explains how the simple act of counting can reverse this evolutionary trend.
While office workers often worry they sit too long while on the job, research suggests standing at work increases the risk of heart disease. (Shutterstock)

Standing too much at work can double your risk of heart disease

Annoyed you don't have a sit-stand desk? Spare a thought for those workers who have to stand all day: Standing may double the risk of heart disease.

Top contributors

More