Articles on Democracy

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Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban addresses supporters after the parliamentary election in Budapest, Hungary, April 8, 2018. RREUTERS/Leonhard Foeger

How Viktor Orban degraded Hungary’s weak democracy

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban has transformed from a liberal into an authoritarian leader who uses the tools of democracy to attack civil society. Hungarians are protesting in the streets.
A woman casts her ballot at a polling station during a runoff presidential election in Bamako, Mali on Aug. 12, 2018. Reuters/Luc Gnago

Competitive elections are good for democracy – just not every democracy

Elections are supposed to hold politicians accountable: Officials who fear losing their seat will work harder for voters. But in some countries, political competition actually makes government worse.
President Joko Widodo (second right) and his vice-presidential running mate, Ma'ruf Amin (right), and their rivals, presidential candidate Prabowo Subianto (second left) and running mate Sandiaga Uno, pose with the electoral numbers that will represent them in next year’s presidential election, during a draw at the General Election Commission office in Jakarta in September. Bagus Indahono/EPA

Incumbent Jokowi versus Prabowo – who will win Indonesia’s presidential election?

Incumbent President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo may have won hearts among potential voters by building roads, airports and ports, but his opponents can still bring him down with other issues.
The Wisconsin State Capitol. Wikipedia/RAHurd

Wisconsin GOP’s power grab is a danger to democracy

Democracies survive if political norms and traditions are upheld. So the recent actions of GOP legislators in Wisconsin and other states to hamstring incoming Democrats put democracy at risk.
The Parthenon is visible for miles around from the Acropolis (citadel) on which it stands. Shutterstock

Blowing up the Parthenon: the power of a symbol

The Parthenon has been seen as central to the history of Western civilisation. But the building has a troubled past that is somewhat at odds with our ideas of democratic values.
Days before their Oct. 28 presidential election, Brazilians protested news that supporters of right-wing front-runner Jair Bolsonaro had used WhatsApp to spread false information about his opponents. Reuters/Nacho Doce

WhatsApp skewed Brazilian election, proving social media’s danger to democracy

Facebook retired its 'Move fast and break things' slogan – perhaps because, as new research from Brazil confirms, democracy is among the things left broken by online misinformation and fake news.
President Donald Trump speaks to the media outside of the White House. AP/Evan Vucci

Lies, damn lies and post-truth

Any amateur politician can engage in lying. President Donald Trump is going further than that. He's engaging in 'post-truth'.
Schools have the opportunity to develop students’ voices and agency to shape greater political civility and civic engagement. Shutterstock

How schools can foster civic discussion in an age of incivility

The extent to which schools foster political deliberation, engagement, understanding and empathy has far-reaching implications for our democracy.
Donald and Melania Trump in Paris last week. According to the Washington Post, the president has made 6,420 false or misleading comments in 649 days. Ian Langsdon/EPA

Friday essay: turning up the level of civilisation

US president Donald Trump's industrial scale deception has dangerous implications everywhere. What then, can we do to foster a more civilised society?
It takes collective action to deal with global issues. from www.shutterstock.com

How to restore trust in governments and institutions

People’s trust in politicians and governments is in decline, but it will take cross-party collaboration to deal with issues such as poverty and climate change.

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